The best RPGs on PC

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What is the best PC RPG? It's not an easy question to answer, hence why we've provided 20 of them for you here. A stalwart PC genre that came into existence in the ‘70s, things have changed a touch since then. The scale and scope is massive like never before, with tech finally starting to catch up to developers' ambitions.

Hello adventurer! We've got all the best loot here, also known as top-notch PC games news, reviews, and features. Dig in and level up your knowledge stats. 

And there's plenty of diversity to boot. Just in the selection below we've got interplanetary exploration, lightsaber duels, bloodthirsty vampires, irradiated mutants who need to be beaten with golf clubs, and whole lot more.

So let's venture forth. Here's our list of the top PC RPGs…

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt

Best RPG The Witcher 3

The Witcher 3 takes all the moral ambiguity, challenging subjects like racism and bigotry and, of course, monster hunting from the previous games and puts them in a massive, mostly open world. The result is an extraordinary RPG that sets the standard for open world adventures.

Every quest is an opportunity to not just learn more about the world, but to be drawn into it. A simple monster contract, directing series protagonist Geralt to slaughter a monster (there are many such quests, and for the first time it actually feels like we’re getting to see Geralt doing his actual job), can transform into an elaborate series of consequence laden stories that span several hours, closing and opening doors as it hurtles towards a usually satisfying conclusion. 

Navigating the complex, dark fantasy world is a delight, even when the oppressive misery of it threatens to send players spiralling into depression. Even the most innocuous of decisions can have a huge impact on the world and its denizens, giving every action a great deal of weight. Impressively, CD Projekt Red also managed to avoid padding the game out with fluff, like inane collectibles and quests to kill x amount of monsters. Every quest has a purpose and a pay off, even if they aren’t clear until many hours later. 

Even better, CD Projekt Red have produced arguably the best DLC ever made with Hearts of Stone and Blood & Wine, which is actually an even better quest than the base game. The Witcher 3 really is something to be devoured until nothing remains.  

Check our praise-filled The Witcher 3 PC review, and also our guide to the best Witcher 3 mods that you can use to enhance your game.

Want more? Here's our The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt review.

Pillars of Eternity

Best RPG Pillars of Eternity

Pillars of Eternity is an exceptional RPG; a game that evokes the best parts of the classic Infinity Engine games like Baldur’s Gate and Planescape: Torment (both found elsewhere on this list) while striking out on its own path with a compelling fantasy yarn and a richly detailed original world.

It’s Obsidian Entertainment at the top of their game, with the beautiful writing that the studio is known for wrapped up in a polished adventure, something they’ve struggled with in the past. Despite being a massive RPG with a daunting amount of options, everything has been crafted with so much care. Religion, philosophy, class warfare, the world of Eora is one overflowing with conflict and crises -- every region on the map is fat with problems waiting for nosey adventurers, and even the most seemingly mundane quests can offer some insight into the world or the chance to create a reputation, good or bad. 

Instead of just cashing in on the popularity of its spiritual predecessors, it builds on those strong foundations to create an experience that doesn’t rely on the past or on nostalgia. It’s progress, and the overall experience is one that’s even more reminiscent of tabletop RPGs than even those rooted in D&D. 

Want more? Here's our Pillars of Eternity review.

Fallout: New Vegas

Best RPG Fallout: New Vegas

Fallout: New Vegas returns after briefly being ousted by Fallout 4. We still love Bethesda’s latest, with its improved shooting, crafting and the fantastic settlement construction element, but New Vegas is simply a better, more liberating RPG. 

Obsidian took Bethesda’s formula for a 3D, first-person Fallout, and chucked back in all the things that made the original isometric games so great. You really feel like you’re making your own way through the game, instead of being nudged along by an invisible director. 

Unlike Fallout 4, which makes you a parent searching for your child, New Vegas just makes you a denizen of the world. You carve your own path, interacting with who you want, being good, evil or anything in between without feeling like you’re going against the grain. You can team up the NCR, join the slave-loving Legion, stand up for Vegas itself or just be a self-serving asshole. Or you can just check our list of the essential Fallout: New Vegas mods and build your own game.

The writing, world-building and black comedy are all spot on, and while we’re on the subject, what will it take for Bethesda to let Obsidian take another crack at the universe?

Planescape: Torment

Best RPG Planescape: Torment

While this list is in no particular order, Planescape: Torment still deserves to be near the top. Black Isle Studios, the titans of Dungeons & Dragons CRPGs, turned convention on its head when they crafted this Planar adventure. There are no more typical fantasy races, morality is not defined, or is at least mutable, and every character attribute is tied to conversations and out of combat actions. It’s a game of philosophy and discovery rather than a monster slaying adventure.

“What can change the nature of a man?” is the question at the heart of Planescape: Torment. The Nameless One is an immortal amnesiac, living many lives, doing deeds terrible and great, changing the lives of those around him, often for the worst. Waking up on a mortuary slab, the mystery of his past propels the Nameless One through the Multiverse, one of the most bizarre settings of any RPG, where he deals with Gods, zealotic factions – like the Dustmen, a faction that believes life is a fleeting precursor to the ultimate existence: death - and mazes both mechanical and magical.

The ambition of Planescape: Torment would have been for naught were it not for the superb writing that accompanied it. Chris Avellone and Co penned a tale saturated with nuance and memorable characters that, even 14 years on, stands the test of time and has yet to be outdone. It’s the only RPG where you'll find yourself searching through the protagonist’s organs to find an important item, or where you may allow an NPC to kill you so that she could experience what it would be like to murder somebody. And all the while you'll wrestled with philosophical conundrums and questions of identity. If that all sounds a bit grisly and esoteric to you, then fret not, as the Nameless One is also accompanied by a floating, talking skull who is an unrepentant flirt, so it’s not all serious.  

Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodlines

Best RPG Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodlines

Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodlines was lamentably riddled with bugs at launch, to the point of being nearly unplayable, but with some patience (and the myriad of community patches) you might find yourself becoming besotted with this bloodsucker. 

You’ve just become a vampire. Surprise! It’s not all seducing teenage girls and sparkling, though, because the world of Vampire: The Masquerade - based on the excellent White Wolf tabletop game - is decidedly more mature. Set in modern Los Angeles, it’s rife with undead politics and secret wars amid the glamour of Hollywood and corporate America. 

The inventive quests, like a visit to the site of a vampire-run snuff movie set, an investigation in a haunted hotel that features no combat and plenty of scares that make even a vampire whimper, or a sneaky infiltration mission in a huge museum are large affairs, and laden with multiple routes and  plenty of opportunities to exploit vampiric abilities like mind control or shapeshifting. The setting of modern America is one unfamiliar in RPGs, and Troika takes full advantage of it with little touches like vampires making deals with blood banks or infiltrating the Hollywood glitterati.

A cracking story of faction politics and prophecy; wildly varied vampire clans to choose from at the start of the game, from the loopy Malkavians to the hideous, stealthy Nosferatu; and writing that is wry and sardonic made it possible to grin and bear the bugs at launch, and in it’s now slightly more stable state, Vampire: The Masquerade is a unique title that you really ought to pick up.

Baldur’s Gate II: Shadows of Amn 

Best RPG Baldur's Gate II: Shadows of Amn

Starting with the original Baldur’s Gate in ‘98 and concluding with the expansion Baldur’s Gate II: Throne of Bhaal in ‘01, the Bhallspawn series charts the trials and tribulations of an adventuring party from the rugged Sword Coast to the wealthy city of Athkatla, where magic is mostly illegal, and beyond to the tumultuous realm of Tethyr.

But it's in Baldur's Gate II where the series really hits its stride

The Dungeons & Dragons land of the Forgotten Realms is meticulously recreated, filled to the brim with gorgeous environments just waiting to be explored. And within them, quests! So many bloody quests. Hundreds of hours of saving villages, delving into mines, fighting mad wizards, slaughtering Gnolls and even a trip to the Planes – explored in more detail in Planescape: Torment – and a deadly adventure into the Underdark.

Elevating these many quests is exceptional writing and dialogue. Baldur’s Gate juggles wit and satire with solemnity and gravitas, drawing players into even ostensibly simple quests. It’s the party of adventurers that join the hero that get the best lines of course, and none more so than Minsc, the infamous Ranger who talks to his cosmic space hamster, Boo. Baldur’s Gate II also has the distinction of having one of the best antagonists in any game: Jon Irenicus, expertly voiced by top-notch player of villains David Warner. Arrogant, powerful, deformed and with a hint of tragedy around him, Irenicus has all the hallmarks of a classic villain, and even while he’s not present throughout most of the game, his influence seeps into everything. 

Mass Effect 2

Best RPGs Mass Effect 2

Marrying the sub-genres of speculative fiction and space opera, Mass Effect 2 is Bioware’s greatest achievement in terms of world or, rather, galaxy building. The exploration and pseudo-science of Star Trek, the cinematic action of Battlestar Galactica and the fantastical elements of Star Wars or pulpy science fiction of the early 20th Century are all on show and artfully combined in this tense suicide mission to save the galaxy. 

Humans are the new kids on the block, recently joining the galactic community, and must shake things up to get all the older races to acknowledge a growing threat to their existence. How do they do that? With an ass-kicking soldier, of course. Commander Shepard is a great character because he’s your character. It’s impossible to define him, because for many he’s actually a she, and rather than being the glory-hunting hero who became a grizzled, downtrodden veteran as he was in my game, he or she might have been a cruel, racist bastard or a paragon of virtue who refuses to let anyone die.    

Dramatic set pieces and workmanlike, if not particularly interesting, squad-based combat are punctuated by BioWare’s trademark, excellent dialogue and simply wandering around alien locales, sticking your nose where it doesn’t belong because that’s what humans do in space, apparently. Suspend your disbelief for the last ten minutes, and you’ll find yourself on one hell of an sci-fi ride. 

The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind

Best RPG The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind

Where Arena and Daggerfall have aged badly, and Oblivion is a bit of a bore (besides the Shivering Isles expansion), the third Elder Scrolls installment remains the gem in the crown of the franchise, and even Skyrim doesn’t quite manage to surpass it. 

One of the first encounters you'll have in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind can kill you right out of the gate. Leaving the prison vessel that transports you to this bleak and alien land, you'll spent little time in the small port town, before venturing out into the wilderness. It's there that you'll encountered a wizard. We say encountered, but he actually almost lands on you, falling from the sky. If you loot his corpse, you'll discover a scroll that the wizard believed gave him the power of flight. Ignoring the results of what was clearly his first experiment with the spell, you may cast it. That's when you'll be launched high up into the sky, able to see the whole land from you amazing vantage point… until you fall to your death

That early encounter – which isn’t a quest, it’s just something that happens – encapsulates what makes Morrowind so magnificent. There’s a gigantic alien landscape begging to be travelled across, filled with strange people and the promise of countless quests and random misadventures. It’s a game where you can murder an important NPC, failing the main quest, and yet can keep playing. 

Diversity is the name of the game in Morrowind. Where Oblivion had its European forests and Medieval towns and Skyrim had its Scandinavian themes, Morrowind is utterly unique, rarely looking like a real-world counterpart. Giant mushroom forests, homes made out of bone and carapace, large floating beasts – the lovable silt striders – for transportation, it’s a weird place. This variety extends to all aspects of the title. Skills, magic and equipment are all much more abundant in Morrowind compared to its successors, and offer more in depth customisation and substantially more character builds. At first it’s confusing, bursting with choice but little direction, but when you start to chart your own path, it becomes a game unlike any other. 

Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic II

Best RPG Knights of the Old Republic II

We were hesitant about putting a game so riddled with bugs that was released in a completely unfinished state in this list, but beneath Knights of the Old Republic II’s cracks and flaws is the best Star Wars game ever made, and an amazing RPG.

Where its predecessor, made by BioWare and not Obsidian, was a fantastic addition to the Star Wars universe complete with a twist worthy of The Empire Strikes Back, KOTOR II takes the venerable IP and takes it in a completely new direction. No longer is the focus on the constant battle between the Dark Side and the Light Side, Republic versus Empire. Instead, we’re treated to a narrative that explores the nature of the force and what it means to be cut off and lost. It’s a story of misfits and traitors and, in retrospect, sometimes feels very much like Star Wars by way of Planescape: Torment. 

Shades of grey permeate through the entire adventure, as the Exile, KOTOR II’s protagonist, is forced to think about every action and how good deeds can beget evil ones, being pushed ever further towards pragmatism. An oft depressingly bleak game, it’s as much about personal exploration as it is about gallivanting across the galaxy, getting into lightsaber battles and using the force, though there’s certainly plenty of that too.   

Perhaps the best thing about KOTOR II is Kreia, the Exile’s secretive mentor. The impetus for so much of the game, she pushes the Exile, berates him and attempts to teach him all the while presenting the force in much more interesting ways than either of the film trilogies managed. It makes the pupil mentor relationship between Luke and Yoda or Ben exceptionally dull in comparison.

Want more? Check out our Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic II review.

Shadowrun: Hong Kong

Best RPG Shadowrun Hong Kong

Shadowrun Hong Kong is a welcome throwback to the ‘90s. Based on the classic tabletop roleplaying game, it’s a neo-noir cyberpunk mystery with plenty of magic, fantasy elements and combat that’s reminiscent of XCOM. That makes it a lot of things, and all of them are just great. Set on a future Earth where science and the realm of the arcane struggle to co-exist and beings like elves and trolls walk the streets along with humans, players find themselves in the shoes of a shadowrunner, a shady mercenary proficient in espionage.

A freeform character creator lets players make all sorts of unusual classes, from spirit summoners who can also enter a digital realm and fight computer programs to samurais who run around with a bunch of remote controlled robots. Dumping some points into charisma also unlocks affinities for different types of people, be they corporate security, other shadowrunners or street gangs, opening up new dialogue options and avenues in your investigation.  

Hong Kong builds on the previous two games, lavishing improvements upon the series like overhauled decking (hacking) and fleshed out, likable characters. It's a more intimate game, as well, as you investigate the death of your foster father with a rag tag group of Shadowrunners and find yourself embroiled in conspiracies, mystical events and a mystery involving dreams that are plaguing the entire city.

Mount & Blade: Warband

Best RPG Mount & Blade Warband

The best of the series, Mount & Blade: Warband is an open-world fantasy RPG crossed with a Medieval simulator, which basically means you never have to pay attention to the real world again. Warband dumps players into a giant sandbox, where six factions duke it out for supremacy, there’s no real story and it’s left to the player to decide what they want to do.

Perhaps the showman in you will inspire you to become a master jouster and champion of many tourneys, or maybe your eye for a good deal will lead you down the path of the wealthy trader, using your mountain of gold to fund a mercenary army to protect you and bring you glory or maybe you’re just a good for nothing crook, and if so, then it’s the bandit’s life for you.

Travelling around the map, you’ll no doubt find yourself waylaid by enemies, or maybe you’ll be the one doing the waylaying, but either way, you’ll no doubt get into scraps. Combat is skill-based, requiring fancy footwork, excellent timing and employment of the right weapon and right attack for different situations. It’s tough to get the hang of, but ultimately very rewarding. You’ll likely have an army at your side, too, leading to some particularly massive conflicts. And that army can be trained, gain experience and be equipped with new gear - though you will have to pay their wages. 

With the multiplayer mode added in Warband and a wide variety of mods, including some impressive overhauls, it’s a game that will easily swallow up your life if you let it.

Deus Ex

Best RPG Deus Ex

Ah, Deus Ex. More of a stealth FPS/RPG hybrid and one of the best cyberpunk games on PC, it’s still more than deserving of a place on this list, as even 16 years on it’s a joy to play and one of the best games ever devised.

We could expend a great deal of energy reminiscing about the dramatic narrative that weaves themes of conspiracy, terrorism and transhumanism together with intriguing characters a believable dystopian future. Equally, we could go on and on about the breadth of character customisation, letting players hone shades and trenchcoat wearing J.C. Denton into a cybernetically enhanced soldier, expert hacker or a ghost, lurking in the shadows. But what we really want to discuss is the incredible level design.

Every map represents a complex sandbox ripe for experimentation. Every combat encounter has the potential to play out in remarkably different ways, should you actually participate in said encounter rather than slinking past it. Secret paths, hidden caches, informants waiting to be bribed and confidential information opening up new routes and options litter levels, ensuring that when players discuss their experiences, it’s like they are talking about different games.

Dark Souls

Best RPG Dark Souls

Dark Souls is the masochist’s RPG. A cruel, relentless battle through a bleak, dead land where the “You Died” screen starts to become an old friend, albeit a mocking one – it’s a punishing bastard of a game but infinitely rewarding. Every battle is a puzzle, demanding skill, good timing and an eye for enemy tells. It’s exhausting, because death is only ever a missed attack or a misreading of an opponent away. But that makes every victory a hard-fought prize, bringing with it the potential for increased power, and progression to the next, even more challenging area. 

The freeform character development and top notch enemy design, both in terms of their grotesque appearance and tricky mechanics, are worthy of high praise, but it’s the sense of accomplishment - coming from surviving despite the odds - that makes Dark Souls worth hammering away at, despite constant failure. 

An unapologetically old-fashioned philosophy to game design permeates throughout the whole stressful adventure, but it’s one blessed with modern complexity and scale. Different weapons and armour completely change the flow of battle and the feel of a character, with the heft of a sword and the weight of plated armour having a massive, tangible impact on strikes and movement. And secreted away through the vast, semi-open world is a cornucopia of trinkets and magical items, rewarding inquisitive players for their risky exploration of long forgotten tombs and subterranean cities. 

They may not save your soul, but the best Dark Souls mods are still worth a look.

Divinity: Original Sin

Best RPG Divinity: Original Sin

Larian’s latest Divinity game isn’t just a throwback to classic CRPGs, it’s a continuation of them. It’s a modern game, but based on the design philosophies of the classics like Ultima and Baldur’s Gate. 

Just check out our glowing Divinity: Original Sin review: “When I play Divinity, I’m back in my parents’ study, gleefully skipping homework as I explore the vast city of Athkatla. I’m overstaying my welcome at a friend’s house, chatting to Lord British. And it’s not because the game is buying me with nostalgia, but because it’s able to evoke the same feelings: that delight from doing something crazy and watching it work, the surprise when an inanimate object starts talking to me and sends me on a portal-hopping quest across the world. There’s whimsy and excitement, and those things have become rare commodities. Yet Divinity: Original Sin is full of them.”

It is an RPG that focuses what the genre can be, and not what it has become. Where conflict isn’t just about fighting, where magic can be used to solve puzzles and manipulate the environment and not just kill enemies, and where simple side-quests can transform into rewarding, huge undertakings involving setting cats up on dates. And it comes with a robust editor so you can create your own adventure, and fleshed out co-op system so that you don’t have to take on the world alone. Halting evil in its tracks is a job for friends, after all.

A sequel, cunningly titled Divinity: Original Sin II, is also shaping up to become an addition to this list.

South Park: The Stick of Truth

Best RPG South Park: The Stick of Truth

It shouldn't be this good. South Park has never translated well when it comes to games, and the show itself has been in a bit of a rut for the last couple of seasons. Yet this manages to be not just a great South Park game, but one of the best RPGs you could have the good fortune to play. 

This is South Park at its best. From the perfect recreation of the town itself, to the biting, insightful, and often grotesque, satire of gaming and pop culture. Fantasy tropes, the Kardashians, Nazi zombies, the mystical powers of Morgan Freeman - they are all there, all lampooned. And all this is wrapped up in an RPG that draws on many sources, from JRPG-style combat, to western open-world affairs. There’s even a healthy dose of Metroidvania exploration. The progression never halts - there’s always something new around the corner, whether it’s a new battle mechanic or a giant weaponised dildo. 

A game where you can dress up a kid as an avenging valkyrie and fight Jack Daniels-gulping hobos and anus-obsessed aliens is something to be treasured. And it’s one of the few games we've ever awarded 10/10 - you can read why in more detail in our South Park: The Stick of Truth PC review.

Diablo III: Reaper of Souls

Best RPG Diablo III: Reaper of Souls

When first making this list, we didn't even give any thought to Diablo III. Blizzard had lost its way, creating a ridiculous economy and removing the need to actually go looking for the best pieces of loot. Playing Diablo III just wasn't very satisfying. 

Then everything changed. 

The build up was massive, with systems being overhauled completely. And then the expansion threw in so many novel features that it became hard to remember why Diablo III was best avoided, helped by the fact that the troublesome Auction House was shut down. It gained a new lease on life, and now you’d be loopy to not pick it up if you love your ARPG clickfests. 

And the new additions keep on arriving. There's now a whole new way to progress through the game, scoring unique rewards while competing against other players. New areas and adventures have been thrown into the mix, and seasons help keep the game relevant year-round. And all these additions came for free. Diablo III really is a classic from-zero-to-hero story. 

Games over! What did you make of our list? Not enough side-quests? Let us know in the comments.

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BCrowe avatarFistynuts avatarDemc87 avatarlenn_eavy avatarmetaldrumcore avatarWingz avatar+63
lenn_eavy Avatar
14
3 Years ago

And not a single word about Gothic! I liked the freedom of first two parts of the series. You did what you wanted because you could. You could, for instance, kill everyone and there were no plot-caused boundaries. Also, there were no simple solutions served you on a silver plate. Even map wasn't there for free, but that was what I liked in this series.

8
madglee Avatar
4
2 Years ago

Yeah, Gothic II is a good mention. I, for that matter. Good work.

2
ChosenUndead Avatar
3
2 Years ago

I don't know about Gothic 1, so many game breaking glitches . . .

1
norki21 Avatar
1
8 Months ago

Imo, Gothic 2 is the best RPG ever made. Just the amazing atmosphere alone should have placed it on this list. Gothic 1 is great too, though has some annoying problems that Gothic 2 deals with, mainly just user-friendliness type of thing. As for glitches, there are patches out there, that make it more than playable, I just replayed Gothic 1. I guess I'm a fanboy, but the games really ARE that good, especially G2.

1
BCrowe Avatar
14
3 Years ago

I'm guessing Fallout/Fallout 2 is the missing F?

4
BCrowe Avatar
14
3 Years ago

Also the Wizardry and Ultima series seem to be missing.

2
Fraser Brown Avatar
954
3 Years ago

I do mention Ultima. I simply don't think the series has stood the test of time at all.

1
raven_skald Avatar
2
3 Years ago

A lot of great games on there, but I disagree about Ultima not standing the test of time. What makes Morrowind, PS:Torment and the like stand out is that they share the same qualities that made (most) Ultima games so great - imaginative worlds, attention to detail, and above all, brilliantly written stories and memorable characters. I'd rather boot up DosBox and play Ultima IV over glossy, paper thin crap like Dragon Age or Fable any day.

2
Welverin Avatar
5
2 Years ago

You sir, are dangerous and wrong.

I'd say seven holds up well.

1
Tuco Avatar
3
Tuco(21 days 14 hours played)
1 Year ago

well, you're WRONG.

1
ChosenUndead Avatar
3
2 Years ago

It's not to say that they aren't great, but rather that others have done the same, but with more to them.

1
Demc87 Avatar
5
Demc87(9 days 22 hours played)
3 Years ago

Dungeon Siege - maybe not a "true" RPG but definitely one of the best in the action RPG subgenre and one of my all time favourite games. When it came out it was technically stunning (great graphics, no loading screens), had an amazing music by Jeremy Soule (if you're not planning to play the game, at least listen to the soundtrack , I can't recommend it enough) and the gameplay was simple but highly captivating. The story was lacking (farmer becoming a hero, saving the world) but this can't be easily forgiven. In my opinion a "must play" for every (action) RPG fan.

4
Fistynuts Avatar
6
3 Years ago

Speaking of action RPGs, Diablo I and/or II surely deserve a mention.

3
Minttunator Avatar
41
3 Years ago

Agreed - if we're considering action RPGs, I'd definitely include D1, D2 or Path of Exile over Torchlight 2. Of course TL2 isn't a bad choice, either - at least they didn't include D3, right? :D

2
Fraser Brown Avatar
954
3 Years ago

I was trying to strike a balance between old and new, and I had so many older classics in the list that I felt that adding some new blood, hence why Torchlight II is there. Also, I would have loved to mention Path of Exile, as it's wonderful, but it is still in beta.

1
Xerkics Avatar
306
1 Year ago

I dunno torchlight 2 didnt strike me as a good or interesting game . Its certainly not in the same league as something like planescape torment. Path of Exile and Torchlight are essentially clones of Diablo with very little that is original , with poor story and cloned game mechanics. Even a shooter like borderlands would fit better at least thats pretty original.

1
Minttunator Avatar
41
3 Years ago

Thanks for replying, Fraser - I completely understand where you're coming from! Minor nitpicks like this aside, this is a very good list for a (almost) mainstream gaming site. :)

1
Kinthalis Avatar
14
Kinthalis(4 days 14 hours played)
1 Year ago

"We bid farewell to the excellent Dragon Age: Origins and welcome Dragon Age: Inquisition"

NO. Just no. Dragon Age Origins featured great tactical combat set pieces, decent side quests, and a decent intro to the lore of the world. Inquisition is an empty, soulless single-player MMO filled with fetch quests, the worst villain in game history, and button mashy action based combat.

NOoooooo!

4
fiendling Avatar
16
1 Year ago

I 100% agree.

Inquisition was a boring slog I abandoned about 40% in.

Origin, on the other hand, I fully completed at least 5 times, each time with a different race/faction.

1
signatureangel Avatar
1
4 Months ago

I would agree with DA:Inquisition I don't mind the long game, if I want to run through it I can totally level up and run the main quests and be done. I like that it's a little less linear than DAO.

That being said....I LOVE DAO. There's nothing like Origins. It's old and I still play it pretty regularly. I can't believe ME2 made the list but no Dragon Age at all :/

1
sacibengala Avatar
3
3 Years ago

I don't know if anyone said it but I really enjoyed the Omikron: The Nomad Soul back in the day. I don't know if it can be considered as a RPG, but that game made me feel in an unique distopian future and role play a lot of individuals with unique questions about life and death. And the soundtrack by mr Bowie just made the whole thing much more weird and impressive, in a pleasent way, of course.

3
Kr7stof Avatar
118
3 Years ago

This is an impressive list.

From these 15 games i'm glad the witcher 2 is on it. Absolutely great game and i regret that i never played Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodlines. I can still buy it but i'm afraid its too old to enjoy it. For me that is. I had that with systhem shock 2. I could not enjoy that game even though i know its a great game.

3
Minttunator Avatar
41
3 Years ago

Hate to sound like a fanboy, but I think you should give Bloodlines a shot regardless! 3D games don't age well, but I think it still looks rather decent and there are fan-made patches available that fix most of the bugs and other issues it had at launch. :)

1
Kr7stof Avatar
118
3 Years ago

No man, feel free to tell me that you really like a game:)

I want to give it a chance and its on steam also so thats a plus. I'm certainly gonne think about giving this game a go:)

I hope its not the same as System shock 2;)

2
Excessum Avatar
93
3 Years ago

I revisited the game about a year ago and finished it... about three times over the span of a month, with different characters and builds. Even though i did not get into it when it originally came out. So there!

Yes, the graphical fidelity is not up to par with today's releases, but it is not that bad, especially once you get your widescreen (and thus high-resolution) fix to work, iron out all the bugs with patches and, importantly, crank up antialiasing, AF and force higher texture and mipmap LOD via your video driver or 3rd party software. I personally endorse RadeonPro, but as the name suggests it helps only with ATI/AMD cards. It makes all of your old games look better once you set up their respective profiles and tinker a bit :)

1
ZimTTS Avatar
4
3 Years ago

Neverwinter Nights - Especially the first, good graphics (for that time), good story and pure D&D with the Forgotten Realms background.

3
sgtgriffin Avatar
1
11 Months ago

100% agreem, I can not believe NWN 1 or 2 is not on this list.

1
SypherLane Avatar
13
3 Years ago

Yes, obviously the original Fallouts should never not be a part of such a list.

As much as I've wanted to get into more RPGs, I tend to fall out (holy crap - that was actually unintentional) of them after a while, even when it's apparent that they're excellent games. The Baldur's Gates have been in my backlog for the better part of a decade, I've never finished VtM Bloodlines or any of the Deus Exes, and my progress through Planescape: Torment is embarrassingly slow. I am not proud.

Fallout is a different story. Or, well, I did bounce off of it at first glance, since the premise of a guy in a tracksuit kicking rats wasn't that appealing to me - but I gave it another shot, and once I got out of that cave at the beginning it got really good. It's one of the very few RPGs I've finished, and it's certainly the only one I've finished more than once.

The setting was really what got me into it in the first place; I really like the idea of the wasteland. I really like saying "the wasteland". Fallout's version of the wasteland is the one that actually feels the way I want it to feel. Seriously, if you took the concept of the wasteland and ran it through a sound converter, Mark Morgan's soundtrack would pop out the other end. The game nailed it.

"Not even the carrion eaters are interested in your irradiated corpse". Nailed it.

The wasteland.

Fallout (and Worms) taught me the fun of turn-based ultra-violence. It's at its best when it gets ridiculously tense: You're traversing the map when you and your party suddenly encounter some heavily armed super mutants. Uh-oh. Uh-f*cking-oh. Time literally stops. There is no escape. What are your chances? Which one do you shoot first? Will you go for the groin? Will Ian's torso be absolutely ripped a-goddamned-part to the high-pitched sound of a screaming minigun? Yes. Yes, it will. And it will look and sound fantastic. Then you will melt the mutants with your plasma rifle and it will somehow look and sound even better.

I'm about to install Fallout 2 again. Here's hoping Frank Horrigan doesn't kick my ass this time.

3
Fraser Brown Avatar
954
3 Years ago

The original Fallout's really are incredible games. I agonised over which Fallout to add to the list, but settled on New Vegas in part because of the excellent modding community that still persists today, who have really added a vast amount of excellent content.

2
madglee Avatar
4
2 Years ago

Hahaha, regarding F2: Yeah, and then as Ian's genitals explode, your mini-gunner rips the next guy in half and you still have to reload the game.

1
Hereticus Avatar
4
3 Years ago

Bit of an acquired taste but the Spiderweb Software RPGs deserve a mention.Geneforge's world building is unique and forms an epic tale over the games, and Avernum and Avadon have wonderful depth

3
Soma Avatar
2
2 Years ago

Agreed. They are probably not well-known enough to be on the list, being a single guy humble work aimed for a particular audience, but these games are amazingly detailed and fun if you enjoy the genre.

I finished Geneforge 1 & 2 and currently enjoying the old version of Avernum 1, hoping to complete both series before 2020. ;)

These games are cheap, in particular if you buy the whole package when it's 75% off (12 games on Steam + 3 on GoG that are not available on Steam, I paid around $15 total) and will give you hundreds, if not thousands, of memorable turn-based RPGing for the price of a pizza.

1
Mr Talltree Avatar
3
2 Years ago

How the hell can anyone say Mount&Blade is not an RPG? You play the ROLE of an individual in a feudal land. You level up abilities, join factions, progress through a story and run quests. Just because there aren't dragons and magic missiles doesn't mean it is not a fucking ROLE PLAYING GAME!

The End.

3
Tal Onzy Avatar
5
1 Year ago

Well for me Dragon Age Origin Ultimate Edition Deserves to be on this list . I have played this game countless times due to its overall replayability & amount of content and I have seen it as recent as a few months ago on sale for as little as $5 .So remove Inquistion from your list and replace with the Original

3
Esivo Avatar
319
1 Year ago

Wait what? KotOR 2 and no KotOR 1? Seriously? No Dragon Age: Origins? I haven't played Inquisition yet, but I bet my spot in hell it's not better than Origins. No way.

And honestly, I've been playing Diablo since release, nothing has changed with RoS. Just more bells and whistles.

-KotOR 2 + KotOR 1

-D3:RoS + Sacred 1

-Dragon Age: Inquisition + Dragon Age: Ogirins

-Mass Effect 2 + Mass Effect 1

-South Park: The Stick of Truth + Fable: The Lost Chapters

-Divinity Origin Sin + Neverwinter Nights

-just off the top of my head.

3
Fistynuts Avatar
6
3 Years ago

The Ultima series springs to mind! Ultima IV was I think the first game to feature character creation through answering moral questions (the gypsy tarot sequence) rather than just pumping numbers into stat areas.

2
Minttunator Avatar
41
3 Years ago

This is really a very impressive list for a (soon-to-be) major gaming site - I'm liking PCGN more and more! Most mainstream sites would (and have!) just go "Skyrim, Final Fantasy VII, Dragon Age, derp derp" and be done with it.

As to the list itself - It could be argued that Fallouts 1 and 2 were better than New Vegas and they're the ones missing from the list. You could've also meant the Final Fantasy series by "F", but I hope I'm wrong in that (besides, those are console games). :P

The Ultima series is notably absent, as is Mask of the Betrayer - the latter sort of flew under the radar since the base game (NWN2) was so terrible, but it's actually got some of the best writing this side of Torment. Gothic II might also deserve a mention.

2
Fraser Brown Avatar
954
3 Years ago

I have a lot of love for Mask of the Betrayer. It felt a lot like a thematic sequel to Planescape: Torment.

2
Jezcentral Avatar
481
1 Year ago

Your list of RPGs just got less moddable. :(

.

Still a good list, though.

2
PostieDoc Avatar
68
1 Year ago

I prefer DA: Origins to Inquisition.

The latter just feels like a single player MMO to me.

I prefer the party members in Origins more as well.

2
Droniac Avatar
50
1 Year ago

Nice list, although - like everyone here - not something I'd entirely agree with.

Some games seem to have been added purely to pad it out with new games, despite everything else in this list clearly overshadowing them. Diablo 3, Torchlight 2, South Park are all undoubtedly good games, but I'd prefer a Witcher 1, Neverwinter Nights 2, or Mask of the Betrayer over those any day. And there are dozens of other, older, games that I'd see making the list before those games would even show up on the horizon.

The only game I'd strongly disagree with, however, would be Mass Effect 2. It's such an enormous step back from the first game in almost every regard: storytelling, pacing, character development, all RPG elements (depth!), and even side-missions. Meanwhile ME3 trumps it in literally every regard other than its ending and - arguably - its opening theme. Sure that ending is the worst 15 minutes of ME ever made, but almost everything else about that game (even the DLC) is an absolutely amazing execution of the ME gameplay concept that neither of its predecessors can rival. In my opinion, of course.

2
KeefBaker Avatar
379
1 Year ago

This is not a "BLEE YOU LEFT OFF X" post but I'd like to put a shout out there for Risen. Yes, it's shonky, full of bugs and wobblier than a three legged donkey but if you put a few hours into it and learn the rather punishing combat system you're in for a real treat with a superbly realized world that doesn't hand hold you.

Does it deserve to be up there with Torment, Divinity and New Vegas? Probably not but it does deserve a shout out as a really good game.

2
KeefBaker Avatar
379
9 Months ago

Is there any chance that when these get edited and reposted you could stick a note up at the top with what was done? Because I'll be buggered if I can tell what's been changed.

2
metaldrumcore Avatar
58
3 Years ago

What about the Fable series or Final Fantasy XI? Final Fantasy VII came out on PC this year too.

1
Kinthalis Avatar
14
Kinthalis(4 days 14 hours played)
1 Year ago

nm

1
Wingz Avatar
5
3 Years ago

Oh, it seems this was only PC games. Oops.

System Shock 2

Cave Story

Ys series

Deus Ex: Human Revolution

Bioshock series

1
Kr7stof Avatar
118
3 Years ago

I respect your opinion but the bioshock series, although good games, cannot be on this list between these games. Not on this level.

3
Wingz Avatar
5
3 Years ago

This comment has been deleted by a moderator.

1
Wingz Avatar
5
3 Years ago

This comment has been deleted by a moderator.

1
Wingz Avatar
5
3 Years ago

This comment has been deleted by a moderator.

1
Kr7stof Avatar
118
3 Years ago

Sorry for the double post but just saying this list got attention on neogaf and are general ok with this list:) I find it worth mentioning this:)

1
Fraser Brown Avatar
954
3 Years ago

Thanks for the heads up!

1
Cricky Avatar
14
3 Years ago

An impressive list with a lot of quality games, all of which I think I have. :) Though I question the inclusion of Mount & Blade Warband. I really like the game however as an RPG it's nowhere near the same level as the rest of this list.

They're nowhere near as well known compared the games on the list however what about one of the RPG series from Spidweb? Avernum, Geneforge, Avadon? Some excellent games there in the old style of RPGs and certainly more RPGy than several games on ths list.

1
Excessum Avatar
93
3 Years ago

Great list, although i feel that it is rather unfair to include the WHOLE Mass Effect franchise, while the other franchises are represented by only one game. And secondly, as much as i love M&B and Deus Ex, they are hardly RPGs. They are games with RPG elements, yes, but not RPGs.

And i will check out Anachronox this weekend, solely on your recommendation, Fraser! To test out your "cred" and level of nostalgic bias. :D

1
Attap Avatar
2
Attap(10 days 15 hours played)
3 Years ago

I really don't understand why people are saying the M&B is not a RPG. I have only played the original release but it gave me hours and hours of play. I still haven't finished playing it. Don't think I ever will. Every step of the way, you increase your skills (actual timing & strategy skills) and hone and define policies of a political/social nature. If by a RPG you mean a game like Oblivion/Witcher where you are cast into the role of a character player with a set task or outcome, then, yes, M&B lacks that original determinism - you can, however, create your own outcome and strive to achieve it. Do so, then start again as another character with a different set of goals. When I'm on horseback armed with my trusty lance and suffering horrible odds, I'm fully in my role and only my skill, quality of mount and chosen fighting companions can save my life. Good stuff.

2
QcPirate Avatar
1
3 Years ago

definetly missing Neverwinter Nights.

1
Wokx Avatar
1
Wokx(2 days 15 hours played)
2 Years ago

SPOILER ALERT KOTOR 2 ---------------------------------------------------

i must say i disagree with your choice of putting kotor 2 on this list and by that ignoring the first kotor game. The overall plot, planets and characters are generally better in kotor and the ending gives you more closure than the second kotor game (this because kotor 2 doesn't give you any information on what really happends after you beat kreia).

I know Kotor 2 delivers better gameplay and less bugs/glitches, but kotor weighs up these issues with storyperfection and a far more meaningful protagonist, then again, these are just my opinions and i would love to hear why you chose to put kotor 2 instead of kotor on the list!

furthermore i do believe the list is fairly accurate, except for the lack of fallout/fallout 2 mentioned below

1
madglee Avatar
4
2 Years ago

This is a great review and has some nice picks for the best cRPGs. I agree that Fallout 2 is missing, and possibly the second to last Wizardry. I was surprised at how deep it was.

1
Soma Avatar
2
2 Years ago

Having 8 of these 15 games in my Steam / GoG libraries and some of the missing ones on my wishlist, I'm glad to know that I picked the best games to add to my backlog. I have a lot of games to catch up and I think I should quit my job and play them all until I have no money left. Who needs a career when you can roleplay! :)

Great list, thank you.

1
MrJinxed Avatar
841
2 Years ago

Hmmm I can't say I really agree with some of the choices in this list. While I'm happy you've included games like Morrowind (best game ever in my opinion) and PS:T, BG2, and such, there are also games features such as Stick of truth, Torchlight 2, and Diablo 3 amongst others. Those doesn't belong to be sure. For other games like Legend of Grimrock, while a good game, it is put to shame by for example Eye of the Beholder 2.

Ah well, all "best games ever" lists are subjective in nature. My list would be very different though. I'd include games such as Might & Magic 7, Ultima: Martian Dreams, Eye of the Beholder 2, and Quest for Glory 3 and possibly 4.

1
Fraser Brown Avatar
954
2 Years ago

The thing is, if I didn't have Diablo 3 or The Stick of Truth and instead put Might & Magic 7 and Quest for Glory 3, I'd just be making a list catering to people who prefer older games. That wouldn't be of much use to people looking to play a modern RPG.

Our goal with these lists isn't just to celebrate awesome games, but to recommend games to check out. That's why I've got the likes of Mass Effect next to games like Planescape: Torment. There are a lot of different games from different eras.

1
MrJinxed Avatar
841
2 Years ago

I hear you, but the list is called the 20 best, not "here are some games I think are great and you should check out".

I do understand that you have to take younger gamers into account who wasn't alive back in the golden ages of gaming, and didn't get to experience the glorious 90s, but a "best" list should be timeless, as it shouldn't matter how old a game is if it still holds up in the present age when making such a list. Then again that's just my opinion, and I'm just one dude on the internet. Maybe I'm wrong!

Taking Diablo 3 and Torchlight 2 over Diablo 2 and Path of Exile is mindblowing though :)

1
Deadite Avatar
36
2 Years ago

Ultima Underworld 2 deserves to be on this list. One of the greatest RPGs I've ever played.

1
smekermann Avatar
3
smekermann(2 days 16 hours played)
2 Years ago

Your choice for #8 is missing, by the way (I'm guessing that's Fallout: New Vegas?)

1
Fraser Brown Avatar
954
2 Years ago

Thanks for spotting that. No idea how that one vanished. And you're right, it was New Vegas.

1
ChosenUndead Avatar
3
2 Years ago

In concerns to torchlight, and I guess Diablo 1-3 too, is it really worth engaging in or bothering with? How about the no lifers who played on day 1, and have done all that could ever be accomplished. Or the mods, that basically turn it into another game entirely. Is there a correct way to game? Is one player base better then the other? With Baldur's Gate, and other single player experiences, they're fine as they are because it's taken at your own pace, regardless of what others have done. And the mods alot of times patch lots of bugs, or otherwise implement features that weren't there before.

1
SarahDactyl Avatar
1
2 Years ago

Hi everyone. I'm sorry, I'm totally out of my element here but I'm trying to find a Christmas present for my brother and any suggestions would be GREATLY appreciated!

He asked for a "new rpg fantasy world builder" for PC. Thank you!

1
LordCrash Avatar
110
2 Years ago

You devalued the whole list by adding Inquisiton.

While all the other games are testaments of passion, heart and a "for the players" mentality, this game is made for the mainstream without having any single strength or focus. Seeing this mediocre-by-design game on this list besides true classics like Planescape Torment, Deus Ex or Baldurs Gate 2 makes me just sad. What happend to the once beloved thing called gaming? The state of the so-called AAA industry is pathetic, especially in the US, where big games are just a business nowadays and no art or passion. By putting games like Inquisition on that list you not only state that you don't care about this development you even support it. Maybe there also something fundamentally wrong how you guys in gaming media review games. All your methodology is cated to these mediocre mainstream experiences. They work, they are polished, they arguably offer at least some fun. 9/10 or at least 8/10.

Not even to mention that games like Gothic II or Ultima VII obviously didn't make it on this list although most true RPG fans might agree that they are the better RPG experiences.

Honestly, I'm angry about that.

1
Fraser Brown Avatar
954
2 Years ago

Calm down. There's no need to be angry about one game you don't like being on a list.

I should also note that we didn't do a scored review for Dragon Age: Inquisition. I did a port review, and I've written a feature about my favourite character, Sera. I genuinely love Inquisition and think it's a delightful, immensely fun game.

I've already explained why Ultima VII didn't make the cut, but the comments are long so I don't mind repeating it for you. Ultima VII is, obviously, great. But with this list, we wanted to balance old games and new games. I also think that a lot of folk would find it obtuse to play now, as it's not aged as well as, say Baldur's Gate II.

Also, us "guys in the gaming media" are just regular people. And a lot of regular people really like Inquisition. We're not secret alien lizard folk with crazy taste in games, nor are we trying to destroy the games industry.

7
AnAuldWolf Avatar
859
1 Year ago

Now that this has been reposted, it's fair game.

This is simply not true. Ultima VII is one of the most user-friendly RPGs there is. My girlfriend, who dislikes the needless complexities of RPGs, had no trouble at all with it. She hates the likes of Dragon Age and the Witcher 3 because they're obfuscated and confusing to her.

Yet Ultima VII was as natural as using Windows. In her words 'if you can move a folder from a place to another place in Windows, you can play Ultima VII.' It's got an incredibly intuitive drag & drop system. Honestly, I think you're confusing it with Ultima VI (or one of the earlier games), and I have my doubts that you've even ever played Ultima VII.

The original Ultima VII, that is. Exult has issues and bugs (disappearing items) that make it much more cumbersome and confusing to play than Ultima VII is if you just boot it up in DosBox. You won't have a bunch of resolutions, view modes, and sound emulation types to choose from (DosBox handles that). You just play.

I honestly find the notion that Ultima VII is outdated in any way to be completely disingenuous to the point of having some sort of agenda or just completely ignorant of the kind of game that Ultima VII is. Ultima VII is not Ultima I through VI, it's a very different game.

You don't even have to juggle stats. You don't have to worry about confusing controls. You can even avoid most of the combat. I can't put much credit in your opinion.

Like I said; That my girlfriend can play it -- whilst she hates even modern RPGs -- speaks volumes. And I agree. It's a game you can just put in front of someone. EVERYTHING you do in it is click & drag.

The only confusing thing I can even think of is setting the battle strategy for your AI companions. But even that is just a button you push on the paperdoll screen. You don't have to go hunting through dropdowns like in Dragon Age. If you know what the pictures mean (and the game comes with a helpful, easy to read reference), then you can set that in seconds. And if you're logical enough, you can just guess from the iconography.

And let me just quote you, here...

"I also think that a lot of folk would find it obtuse to play now, as it's not aged as well as, say Baldur's Gate II."

How? How do you even have that opinion? In Baldur's Gate II, you're juggling statistics, and VARIOUS user interface elements. It's a much, much more archaic system. Let's compare...

http://oyster.ignimgs.com/mediawiki/apis.ign.com/baldurs-gate-enhanced-edition/thumb/d/d2/Baldur_2012-12-07_18-55-03-46.bmp/468px-Baldur_2012-12-07_18-55-03-46.bmp.png

That's a MASSIVE info dump. With walls of text. And how do you even get to the inventory? Someone new to RPGs would be incredibly confused by it!

Now, let's look at Ultima VII!

http://lparchive.org/Ultima-VII-The-Black-Gate/Update%202/8-U7_0A_08.png

"So I double-click on the bag to get at my items?"

It's intuitive! It uses easy to understand iconography instead of spamming the player with text and complexities so that they instantly feel overwhelmed.

How can you say -- unironically, and with a straight face -- that BG2 has a more intuitive, less obtuse interface than Ultima VII? I don't understand.

If you didn't want to include it because it's not your taste, that's fine! Didn't like it? That's your opinion! What I don't like is dishonesty.

1
BigWelshMike Avatar
14
BigWelshMike(6 days 7 hours played)
3 Months ago

You definitely need to give your anger some serious thought if something like this makes you like this. Wow. :-\

1
huldu Avatar
224
2 Years ago

I played a bit of grimrock 2 and I just don't see it as a "great" game. I thought it was okay. Also did some wasteland 2 and that falls into the same category. While it's nice to see these style of games today is awesome they don't feel as "epic" as they could have for me at least.

On another note, I picked up arcanum and gave it a shot. Wow, that's my only comment. That is indeed one nice gem. Loving the game, even tho the graphics are quite dated. The dialogue is just mind-blowing and it has so much replay value. I haven't laughed that loud in quite a while playing a game, arcanum on a 1 int character. The conversations can be hilarious.

1
Fraser Brown Avatar
954
2 Years ago

Arcanum is spectacular. I highly suggest, once you've played through it once, to make a very stupid character. It's a lot harder to play, but the dialogue choices are just brilliant.

1
Dat Shambler Avatar
1
1 Year ago

No Darksiders 2.

Sad shambler is sad.

1
Shriven Avatar
3277
1 Year ago

Somewhere between Dragon Age and The Witcher there is a Nirvana. I hope and IP stumbles across it someday.

1
NihlusGreen Avatar
570
NihlusGreen(6 hours played)
1 Year ago

Does Dark Souls need to be updated to reflect GFWL removal?

How long does a thorough play through of Planescape Torment take?

1
shroom Avatar
1
1 Year ago

Nice list, I would have added

ME1

Baldurs gate 2

Eye of the beholder 2

Curse of the azure bonds

System shock 2

1
Daaksanir Avatar
2
1 Year ago

Good list, always nice finding new games I might have missed. Of course, personal interests usually differs, I for one doesn't think Dragon Age: Inquisition is better than Origins, which to me was the best rpg so far. Still have thoughts of Ultima Underworld, though that game is ages old. System Shock 2, Wizardry and Fables are others I had huge fun playing.

1
hfm Avatar
97
1 Year ago

I think with a list like this, I like the direction they are taking. It should be the 25 best RPG's that you would still want to play today, if you haven't played them.

Obviously this is an opinion based list and as soon as you constrain it to 25 games and try to include a bunch more modern games, nearly everyone is going to say that GAME X is missing from the list.

1
Kaijentai Avatar
1
1 Year ago

Great list, but I feel as if Final Fantasy must be added to make it complete. 7, 8, and 9 are my favorites (with 9 at the head), but 6 is also incredible. And I've heard good things about 4. FF definitely deserves a seat on this RPG thrown. Oh, and DRAGON AGE: Origins blows Inquisition out of the water. Hands down.

1
Rampheus Avatar
58
1 Year ago

How can anyone take this list seriously when it doesn't even include Icewind Dale!!? Maybe it was a little lite on story for some people who would rather read a novel than play a video game, but PC RPG combat and tactics doesn't get any better than what Icewind Dale had to offer. My testicles shrivel up a little to this day remembering some of those intensely gut-wrenching battles.

1
Tylaris Avatar
1
1 Year ago

Well, honestly reading through this, I kept thinking "Y'know, for a reviewer :P, this guy doesn't have a bad taste". It's good you included rpg's of all shapes and sizes and respect games of old as much as more recent ones.

Until I hit the last two.

When you look at all of the above, none of them can be considered a flawless game, but each contributes something unique to the genre, that sets them apart...Wild Hunt with it's handcrafted massive world and terrific quest design, Morrowind's legendary lore, VTMB amazing atmosphere and roleplaying opportunities based on your class etc,etc...but Diablo III and DAI?

No doubt they are (mostly) fun, enjoyable games, but both represent a trend of games without any trace of "character" their sequels had and show simplification of their mechanics for the purpose of being sold to a wider audience...at the same time bringing nothing new to the table.

Diablo II and Gothic I, would do better in their place, in my opinion.

1
soth897 Avatar
3
1 Year ago

Played about half of these, all deserving their place here. It's true, some classics are left out (Fallout1/2, Diablo 1/2, etc.), but gamers' attention spans are getting shorter by the year, so you can't really expect new gamers to try out older titles like these (even if they are better than their contemporary incarnations :) ).

It's interesting that people want to see DA:O on this list. Maybe I just played a different game (this is the PC version, not console), but I can't say I was very impressed by it, especially given what was under the company's belt already. The interface was clunky, the mechanics were often painful, and despite it being touted as having huge replayability, I found it had almost none. If ever there was a poor console-to-PC port, this is one. The origin stories (for which the game is named) seemed uninteresting and predictable, and it was grueling having to play through the first few hours of that game again until you got to a point where the world opened up slightly. Overall, it felt like it belonged in an earlier age of game development and should have been produced by a less reputable company. Just my 2 cents though.

1
Inquisitar Avatar
74
1 Year ago

Fallout 4? RPG?

Are you seriously

1
Shriven Avatar
3277
11 Months ago

I love the fact that Planescape: Torment is so high up. Parts of that game wear amazing. Ill never replay it though. I dont want its memory disturbed.

1
tom.trog69 Avatar
18
8 Months ago

I can't even read about Mass Effect 2 without getting angry. Turns out I'm such a spaz, I can't get past the very first lock, so I paid for a game that is too difficult to continue within the first minute of play. Screw that game.

1