Why I’m uninstalling Windows 8 | PCGamesN

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Why I’m uninstalling Windows 8

Windows 8: torture incarnate.

As a cruel trick on myself, about a month ago I installed Windows 8 on my main PC to see what it was like.

The answer is: abysmal.

I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that Windows 8 is the worst computing experience I’ve ever had. As a desktop operating system, it’s annoying, frustrating, irritating, and baffling to use. I’ve tried on many occasions to explain exactly why it’s so awful to use day-to-day, and most of the time, smoke starts pouring out of my ears. I thought it would be better to get down exactly what the issues are and why you should avoid it.

What it comes down to is this: Windows 8 is a tax on your brain. That dealing with it, day in, day out adds to your world being slightly worse in a dozen different but slightly irritating ways.

This isn’t an exhaustive list, but it is an exhausting list of reasons why I’ll never touch Windows 8 again. I'm not alone: game developers worldwide have declared Windows 8 a catastrophe.  

Windows 8 is really meant for tablets

Windows 8 brings a new kind of computing design to the desktop. Once called Metro (until Microsoft realised that Metro is also the name of a German supermarket), it’s a design motif that’s meant to be appropriate across tablets, mobile phones, the desktop, and eventually, televisions. To be fair to Microsoft, Metro is a decent way of poking at your computer with a finger. But when you have the flexibility and precision of a mouse, it makes no sense. In Metro Most of your screen is taken up with white space. Text is bigger, the buttons are bigger, the borders are bigger. There’s less information, more wastage. It’s a complete mess.

The treatment of the desktop as an app is an out and out disaster

The Metro interface is Windows 8. The desktop that you’re used to is also there, but it’s built as a separate app. Think of it this way: Metro is the shell. The desktop is an app within that shell. If you want to start Steam, you’ll want to launch the Desktop app, and then launch Steam.

This is insanity. This is Windows 8.

Window management is a pain in the arse

Metro apps don’t have any window controls. If you want to swap between apps, you have to make a convoluted mouse gesture - move the mouse to the top left of the screen, and then down to select the window. You can’t minimise the app, and there’s no on-screen preview of what’s running to help you quickly switch between programs.

You can pick up windows and shunt them, say, to a second screen, which initially feels relatively useful. But I’ve discovered more than anything that you spend more time fiddling with their arrangement than actually doing anything useful with them.

Switching between Metro apps is a complete farce

I can’t get over how Microsoft have managed to break one of the basic functions of a GUI - swapping between running programs. Metro programs have no window controls and take up the entire screen. Therefore, there’s no easy way to switch between them using on-screen controls. You have to engage in unfamiliar mouse movements to swap between them.

Core apps that offer basic OS functionality are Metro only. And they’re awful

There are certain things that you do with your PC every day that should form the basis of the operating system. Email. Instant Message. Calendars. Media Playing. All of these functions in Windows 8 are carried out through Metro apps, and they are universally awful. There are no desktop apps included that do a similar job.

The email app is awful

The email app is horrendous. It is the worst email client I have ever used. It’s a full-screen Metro abomination that hides or is missing basic and vital functionality (search, column sorting, filtering). It’s full-screen, but only shows a small sample of your messages - so the screen real-estate is massively wasted. If you have multiple email accounts, there’s no combined inbox view. It’s slow to check and sync your email - unless you force a manual refresh. And the first time you use it, you will struggle to find the ‘send email’ button. Pro-tip - it’s the (+) in the top right.

The messages app is bafflingly terrible

The instant message app is near unusable for day-to-day work or play. It’s a full-screen Metro app, so it takes up all your screen when all it needs to do is appear in a small box. There’s no combined contact view - if you want to start messaging people, have to enter a separate app (the people app), and select message from within that. It currently only supports MSN and Facebook messages - so you’ll still have to run a Google Chat or IRC client separately. But because it tries to combine message accounts, you’ll often discover that friends will receive messages over different accounts, at the same time. I’ve had situations where my friend is receiving the same message on Facebook and MSN at the very same time. Other times, the app has refused to let me even enter a message into the box. It’s so utterly and intensely ludicrous I hate it’s very guts.

The Calendar is unworkable

I’ve given up entirely on the calendar, because it’s terrible. Changing to a week or day view requires a right click to make the control interface appear. I can’t work out how to edit an appointment, nor can I work out how to delete an appointment. There’s no way to show events from just one calendar. I think it may well be easier to alter my own birthday than to edit when it’s currently set for in the Windows 8 calendar. I really want to be making this up.

The video and music players are abysmal

The default Windows media player is a full-screen Metro abomination. It’s slow, and the interface is clunky, and you’ll struggle to find and play the files you want. Worse, though, is that it struggles with complicated storage options. All of my music and video is stored on a Network Attached Storage device - but the Windows Video and Music players can’t seem to index those files. If I want to play something, you have to work through the folder structure using Metro’s awful internal file browser.

Internet Explorer just needs to stop

There are two versions of Internet Explorer, both bad. The first is the Metro browser, and it’s essentially unusable on a desktop which hides basic controls light refresh, the browser bar, the back button and everything else you use on a day-to-day basis behind a right click. The Metro browser is the default - so any Twitter links you click until you can turn it off, will be opened in the Metro browser.

The Desktop app version of IE isn’t necessarily terrible - it just occasionally takes over your default browser when you’re not looking. Despite me regularly returning the default browser to Chrome, IE still decides it wants to be the default option for opening links sent by IM, and the option to change it is greyed out.

It seems have inspired other developers to lose their mind

Google Chrome has now silently updated to integrate better with Windows 8. Now, when it’s started from the Start Menu, it opens up an entire full-screen window, and it can only be displayed in that full-screen window. The only route to prevent that happening is to install a shortcut to the app on your taskbar. When it’s started from the taskbar, it behaves as you’d expect.

Desktop windows have got more complicated and less useful

The ribbon from Microsoft’s office products is now integrated into the Windows interface. For instance, in the file manager, rather than the ‘view’ menu being neatly arranged into vertical options, if you click view on a window it displays a ribbon of all the options in the view menu with randomly placed icons next to each-other.

The Charms bar is bafflingly unusable

The charms bar appears when you hover your mouse in the top right or bottom right corner of your screen. It's meant to help you with basic but universal tasks. Like search, or sharing. But the search function rarely finds what you want - it will only search within Metro apps, and you have to specify the app you want to search in separately. The share button only works in Metro apps, as well - you can’t share from within any desktop apps. So it's entirely pointless. 

There are random and delightful bugs and compatibility issues

Yes, there are bugs in Windows 8. And yes, they’ll probably be ironed out as development continues. But some of the bugs I’ve encountered as so weird as to suggest my entire PC has been traumatised. In order: Star Wars: The Old Republic now simply refuses to update. I can’t play full-screen video on a second monitor in Chrome. There are no drivers available for the bluetooth chipset on my motherboard. Unity games, like the brilliant Brickforce, don’t work. It goes on, and on, and on.

If you’re using Metro apps, there is no clock

FFS.

It’s harder than ever to turn the sodding thing off

It took me nearly half an hour to work out how to turn off my PC. So: here’s exactly how you do it: You move your mouse to the bottom right or top right of your screen. You then click on options. You then click on power, and then finally, you click on the Shutdown option.

Windows 8 comes out in just under two months - it’ll be available from October 16th. You should not buy it.

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CAJO's picture
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Horibble horrible horrible, worst OS in history. Was at a friends place helping her set up her internet (she got a new laptop with win8) and it was the most confusing thing i've ever done, windows 8 completely blows. Win7 ultimate was and still is great, sticking with that till windows wakes up to itself.

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fsxn00b's picture
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i find it ok on laptops because you can use two fingers to swipe on the start screen, but although saying that if you have a desktop pc with the new update you can bypass the start screen.

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Reverb's picture
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Win8 is fine and OK while it's working smoothly,

but if anything ever goes wrong, you are FUCKED.

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BigJames's picture
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Alternative: OSX mavericks or linux ubuntu (though i prefer mint).

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I second everything the author says. I got quite my share of windows certifications, windows 8 UI on the desktop is a step backward.

Having to hit a key or move the mouse to see the clock is a waste of energy, I got used to aero in less than 3 seconds. I tried to use 8 for half an hour to get the hang of it and just gave up in frustration.

I switched to windows server 2012, and discovered the same crap. win 8 interface on the admin tools, which means that the admin tools i so learned to love with 2008r2 are now MORE complicated to use and most tools in the server manager area are now just overviews telling that everything is allright, you actually lose time as you have to launch the tools to do anything at all. Also a big step backward when you finally manage to get used the way 2k8R2 is managed.

All in all BAD UI design everywhere which got me to loose time to do simple things like creating users, managing a dhcp or a printer... etc.

If i could have the 2012 kernel and improvements with the 2008R2 UI I would be happy...

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stupid kids haters :X

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you uninstall win 8 cause you are stupid hater motherfucker son of a bitch 1

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There are so many inaccuracies in the article, you should sell your computer. You're a danger to yourself.

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GUIs are supposed to make things quicker and easier to use. Even adding an extra click to shutdown is ridiculous - clicking is slow (find the mouse pointer, move it to where you want to click and then click, then move it to click again...). The best I've seen is the Mac laptops - press the power button and then return to shutdown (two keys that strangely enough are always in exactly the same place ;)

Full screen apps are also a productivity nightmare - even now I've copied a couple of paragraphs I want to comment on into a text editor and have that window open alongside this one to refer to. Metro seems nuts. I am totally with the article writer on this - the Metro full screen paradigm is crazy - instant messages is an app that is always open in the corner of the screen, not open exclusively 99% of the time. There are a few apps that it is good to have open full screen some of the time eg photo editing but even then you should have the choice.

Tablets seem to leave data stuck in particular apps - non-transferable - and having less screen real-estate they make the apps full screen, but this is quite limiting, but understandable , but inappropriate on a desktop or a laptop.

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@Brainling says "Shortcuts are the lifeblood of PC power users" & "Go back to Mac OS X if you want to do everything with a mouse and never touch a hotkey"

Hotkeys are essential if you want to be productive on any system, but they should not be essential. It's ok for power users who are going to learn them, but most windows users (not power users) do not have a clue. In OS X at least the hotkeys are consistent and memorable and in Linux the are fully configurable. (How should I remember alt-F4 or F5? Whereas cmd-m minimises, cmd-q quits, cmd-n gets me a new window, cmd-r refreshes, cmd-i gets me info, cmd-? gets me help... all set up ready for me to use)

@BAReF00t: I expect you are right. The writer is so used to the Windows monoculture and the hard learning required to get going with it that they are unable to adapt - I wonder if they switched to OS X they would struggle too - my girlfriend really struggle with OS X and yet I am sure that logically it is the easier system, but just different (but I am also sure I have got used to most of its quirks and I still hate the fact that delete forward is fn-delete, not shift-delete (delete being backspace in mac parlance!))

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Wow, the worst article ever created over a piece of software: totally uninformed and missleading, i think you were given a task: write a bad article, congratulations you made it! Almost nothing is true, let me guess, open source fan boy on a really bad day? Have some self-respect

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To all of you talking about keyboard shortcuts, where is the keyboard on a tablet? I am a software developer with 40 years experience and I could not develop using Windows 8 (I understand the Microsoft Developers turn off Metro/Modern Ineterface when working). A user interface is meant to be intuitive, which means users know what to do without thinking about it. When Microsoft had their usability labs (I not sure if they still do) the idea was that any one could sit down in front of the UI and use it without any tuition.

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I'm sorry but you just sound like a grumpy kid. Eventhough it took me a while to adapt to the new UI it wasn't a horrible experience. I won't say why your complaining didn't have point and just sounded like a nag from some kid who's reluctant to change old habbits. But the fact that

"It took me nearly half an hour to work out how to turn off my PC" tells me you shouldn't write tech articles anyways.(It's even easier than before to turn your PC off in win8.)

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I agree with this, but I still kind of like it. I installed the RTM version (available on MSDN) about a week ago, and it's been updating and fixing itself ever since. I agree that the Mail app is idiotic: I'm still using Outlook. I've been ignoring the Metro side of it, by and large, because most of the apps are utterly useless, as you say, and I've installed VIStart on it, which is a bit of shareware out on the internet which restores most of the Start menu functionality. The OS is fast, though: driver issues aside (and we hope these will be fixed by the "real" release date -- they should be, since the manufacturers received the RTM version a month ago; I had similar issues with my Bluetooth drivers, but was able to use Orca to hack the Windows 7 version and thus allow it to install) it's much smoother than Windows 7, and is very obviously arbitrating hardware and memory usage a lot better.

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Some points are valid -- but mostly minor because most people actually don't use the built-in apps for mail, calendar, etc. If Microsoft wants to try something new there, then I say bravo. But short answers to the others:

1) "you’ll want to launch the Desktop app, and then launch Steam". NO. You'll launch Steam from the Start screen (which is really just a larger, easier to read and navigate Start Menu which doesn't hide in a corner on a large screen) and Steam launches. The end. Like you did before in windows 7.

2) "Switching between Metro apps is a complete farce". Try alt-tab. You know, like you should have been using already. Windows 8 is about learning a little keyboard and losing a lot of clutter.

3) "App [X] is awful". None of the default apps on Windows have ever been shining examples of brilliance. They're just One Way To Do It. Go get a real browser, email client, video player, etc, etc. Just like you used to. Or try Microsoft's New Way. Some people will like it. Others won't.

4) "It seems have inspired other developers to lose their mind". Good devs will try to follow guidelines for making their apps fit in with the rest of the OS. This isn't losing your mind -- it's something more devs should try. Then accessibility wouldn't be such a pain. And btw, I have launched chrome from the Start Screen -- without the fullscreen baloney you're talking about. So I guess it *doesn't* have to be that way. I didn't do anything funny. Did you?

5) "Desktop windows have got more complicated and less useful". I disagree. The new explorer interface is, for me at least, more usable because I don't have to hold down the Alt key to make magic functions appear. I can just click on them. But they also don't waste space when I don't want them. But again, there are a plethora of file managers out there. Don't like Explorer? Get something else.

6) "The Charms bar is bafflingly unusable". Some people will like charms, others won't. Just like plenty of features in each version of Windows that came before. I haven't found a compelling use to force me to use the Charms bar, so I really don't care (I know someone is going to bleat "what about shutting down?" and I have an answer for that below)

7) "There are bugs". Dude. Windows 7 still has bugs in it. So does Vista and XP. With thousands of lines of code, that's going to happen. I haven't had a show-stopper yet but the cautious in the crowd should wait for SP1 -- just like they always used to.

8) "If you’re using Metro apps, there is no clock". Same goes for fullscreen games. Just like it always was. Perhaps there's room here for some kind of OSD overlay app. I haven't found a neat way to do it yet so I'm using the low-tech approach: any one of the devices around me which can tell the time (watch, cell-phone, etc). No biggie.

9) "It’s harder than ever to turn the sodding thing off". I understand that Microsoft is trying to follow the new trend to keep devices on, or rather suspend them when not in use to make it quicker and easier to get back to what you were doing. I don't mind that idea, but I also found the charms bar a mission for shutting down (or rather, rebooting, since that's more often what I do -- go back to Linux after some gaming). But, guess what? Ctrl-Alt-Del still works. Like it used to. You get shutdown options there easily enough.

I applaud Microsoft for being uncharacteristically bold and actually trying to innovate something new in the OS arena. If you don't like it as it came out of the box though, there's lots of ways you can work around it -- just like we always used to.

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We are too used to thinking MS will always be around and always be on top. Change is part of the long term business cycle.

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Yeah, I've been using Win8 for over a year now and watched the interface mature. Every new release I hoped they would split it into 2 versions: one for Tablet/Cell and one for Desktop/Laptop, with the user able to override the version that gets installed.

I have been using an Ivybridge ULT with touchscreen and Win8 for 3 months and find myself using mouse and keyboard for almost everything. The touchscreen on laptop makes no sense (at least the Win8 model)

I just started using a Win8 tablet based on SNB last week and need to take all of the following to meetings: mouse, docking station (to stand the tablet), power supply (optiona but recommended)l, stylus, and (occasionally) a keyboard. All just to be able to be productive in a meeting (like check and respond to emails or take minutes/notes).

The current Win8 model and x86 Tablet market are in trouble if this is the best they can come up with.

I should get my win8 phone in the next week or so, should be interesting.

Oh, and yeah, I spend 80% of my time in the Win7 Desktop shell and 10% Googling how to do simple tasks, with instructions like "Go to the Metro view and start typing Control Panel" to get to the control panel... Hm, on XP/Win7 I had to right click the 'My computer" icom and select properties/Device manager. On Win8 I need to exit Win7 Desktop view and start typing (no input box is displayed, btw, just open the keyboard and type on a random window...wtf?)Control PAnel, the switch view to small icons and look for device manager - all with my fatty fingres on the incredibly small text hitbox, or I get the wrong icon and need to start over. How the hell is this better than Win7? Any corporation that switches to Win8 is going to suffer 20% productivity loss for 3-6 months. Good luck selling that.

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It took you a half hour to figure out how to power it off? And you're complaining about the addition of the ribbon to the file manager? The ribbon UI has been a feature of MS products for seven years now and you still haven't figured out how to use it...

From a usability standpoint the ribbon, once you're past the initial learning curve, is light years better than the old menu format. And it's been around for seven years.

Please tell me why someone who hasn't been able to figure out the Ribbon in seven years is qualified to offer a review of WIndows 8 usability?

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I'm surprised you gave it such a good recommendation - I found windows a lot worse to use!

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May I translate to portuguese and share your post in two places? A community blog at www.mmotales.com.br and my personal blog at www.dmoriam.com.br? I share the same point of view.

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I've read so many articles about Windows 8, negative, positive and so-so, but this one really stands out. Not one good thing to say about Windows 8? Really? I think it would be wise to give Microsoft a little more credit. They're not a fly by night upstart just getting into the game. Do you think all their smart designers suddenly quit and were replaced by idiots? The author of this article is in grave danger of being on the wrong side of history. Microsoft may not have it exactly right yet, but they will get there and right now they are taking the lead.

What they are trying to do with Windows 8 HAS to be done if technology is to advance, i.e. merge operating systems between workstations and handhelds. We need to get to a point where human interaction with computing devises is a universally consistant experience regardless of the size of the screen. Furthermore, Windows 8 represents the end of skeuomorphic elements in os design. Remember when car manufacturers put massive fins on their cars and tons of chrome and every car looked very different? And what about now? You can barely tell one mid-sized sedan from another even between foreign and domestic manufacturers. Moving away from skeuomorphism in os design is an inevitable stage in the evolution of the GUI and Microsoft is finally taking the lead. Apple now has some catching up to do.

Our company recently switched from Windows to Mac desktops and some of the features this author is complaining about (like not having any indication of which programs are currently running) were encountered by us Windows users in the well established Apple os. We got over it in due course and are now happily computing again.

Remember the AMC Pacer, that bubble shaped car from the seventies. That's where we are right now in the evolution of computing. The world was not ready in the seventies for the Pacer with it's rounded shape, lack of skeuomorphic embellishments and large expanses of glass. But, with a little upgrading, I'll bet it would blend right in on today's highways.

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I installed windows 8 on my mac with boot camp just to try it out thinking I would just use it a couple of times but I find myself using it more than the mac os. I like it!

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Sorry to hear about your bad experience with windows 8. I find it very easy to work with and actually very nice. I did not read the whole article so my bad if you already mentioned this. What OS did you use before windows 8? And what do you use it for? Games, Development? TIA

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It is so sad that ppl never appreciate anything good. Win8 is the best ever. When will they learn? It's sad that a one who calls himself a professional will write an article like this. Leave it or take it, Windows 8 is a success without you. Say all you can and write all you can, it will never change the value of Windows 8 and the impact they are making in our world. What have you done to change your world. LEARN TO SEE THE GOOD IN OTHERS!

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That would be "Stockholm syndrome".

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"You clearly don't know how to use windows 8. Learn to use and then write about it."

If you wrote something like the above statement (and many have) then you have no business near a PC.

It's 2012, even common users should already understand basic notions of UI consistency and intuitiveness. If you have to "learn it" (after using the OS for nearly 2 decades), then it's NOT DONE RIGHT.

Same goes for people touting keyboard shortcuts. It's a bloody graphical OS, and one meant to also be used with tablets at that. It should work and be intuitive with the mouse first and foremost, and ONLY THEN have a full keyboard shortcut accessibility. If it's unintuitive with the mouse, it's BROKEN.

There not much to argue here: Windows 8 is a half baked attempt at the tablet market, and it's a lame ass Desktop OS because it mixes two different metaphors and use cases without trying to do the best for each case. Other things, like no search in email is simply indefensible. It's full of small and big usability disasters.

Perhaps it will get better with Windows 9, but as it is it is far worse than the previous version.

Some guy writes:

"""- This entire section is a review of the apps that come with Windows 8, not Windows 8 itself. To review the apps on their own is fair, but don't turn them into a red herring. These apps are in no way forced on you -– there are plenty of desktop-based alternatives out there."""

It's 2012. Those apps (the media player, the email client, the calendar etc) are indispensable parts of an OS, especially when talking about a Desktop OS. What should he be criticising instead, the process scheduler changes or the new driver APIs? Really, the fact that they "come with the OS" does not give you a hint?

It makes no sense to judge the OS without also judging those kind of apps, which most people will be using every day, and most people have their data, libraries, mails etc on the previous versions of and don't want to switch unless forced to.

@springheel borders on the moronic:

"""It took me nearly half an hour to work out how to turn off my PC". The fact it never occurred to the writer to consult help files or do a net search tells you all you need to know about his approach to working with a brand new OS - Hit Button! Button Not Work!! Hit Different Button!!!! """

The fact that it occurred to you to "consult help files" or "do a net search" tells all we need to know about your computing skills: mainly that you are a "stockhold syndrome" blame-thyself relic of the nineties that does not know anything about UI design, and thinks that people should "read the manual" before using a PC.

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What bullshit you are talking about???

The author doesn't know anything about Win8 and living with old thoughts old thinking...

try to shift to Windows 95 or at DOS OS old man...

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1st time here.....last time here

What a troglodyte. Thank god Msoft have been developing for 30 years, hate to have read your review of msdos 1.0

You would have demended we through away our trusting 8086's and go back to sharpened sticks.

Learn, strive to understand and don't give up after 10 mins.

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This is the worst part of internet where anyone can write anything. Your post is the best example of "How an idiot blogs" You clearly don't know how to use windows 8. Learn to use and then write about it. Anyways, for much of your problems try (WinKey + Tab) and (WinKey + C)

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This article is a bit negative, but I have to agree over all. I've installed Windows 8, but I only use it for games, Steam specifically. Most of my computing is done elsewhere (OS X, Linux, Mobile etc) so I've not actually had to use Metro very much. But when I have, the browser and email clients, all the Metro based ones are totally dumbed down garbage.

I like the iPad.

But I do not want my powerful desktop PC with 27" LCD turned into a huge Microsoft iPad, with similar imposed limits on ability and functionality.

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Here is a simple registry hack that will restore the start menu in Windows 8. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CAuvlmPbJE&feature=related

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Here is a simple registry hack that will restore the start menu in Windows 8. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CAuvlmPbJE&feature=related

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Windows 8 maybe great for all the developers out there who know command shortcuts, etc, but what about the average person? Windows 8 is supposed to be intuitive, but if you have defend it's usability by pointing out shortcuts that the average user would never know, it's already failed. Have the shortcuts been around for 20 years? Sure. Does your average PC user know about them? No. I'm not talking about the gamers, developers, or coders. I'm not talking about people who know how to install a graphics card or extra RAM. Your average user doesn't know jack about those kind of things, and Windows 8 is supposed to be built towards their experience. And again, if usability must be defended so vigorously, it has failed.

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You guys need to look at the 'good bad OS formula. Its never failed. http://www.vincentabry.com/en/windows-8-good-or-bad-971 ps I had people telling I was a loon for complaining about Vista.

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LOL if people have to actually defend the usability of something then IT'S ALREADY A FAIL.

They keep telling people to "understand an OS" but THEY don't know the first thing about USABILITY

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Install Classic Shell and it brings back the start menu and you'll also have the benefit of booting to desktop for those who don't like Metro. One positive thing you can say about Windows 8 is that it has less running resources. The amount of resources running under Windows 7 is ridiculous at times. At least that's something that has been rectified and Windows 8 Enterprise is quite nippy on my i5 2500k.

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I tried the beta version for a couple of hours. I couldn't even figure out how to start 90% of the things he evaluated in this article. It took me a while to figure out where my applications and software were. How to open and close them. Heck this thing is a waste of resources.

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I had to create an account just to comment:

I'm not sure the author of this article could have outed himself as less informed than he did. How does someone who is writing any sort of review of Windows not know Alt-Tab switches between apps? Alt-Tab has been a Windows shortcut key for over twenty years. The Steam launching in the desktop from a tile thing I can forgive, you wouldn't know that if you hadn't tried it (though really the author SHOULD HAVE TRIED IT before writing this piece), but not knowing Alt-Tab is just shameful.

@eduard: Shortcuts are the LIFEBLOOD of PC power users. They aren't a step backwards. That comment has to be almost as silly as the original article. Go back to Mac OS X if you want to do everything with a mouse and never touch a hotkey. This is Windows, where we use hotkeys, and expect the people reviewing Windows operating systems to know the most basic of them.

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All of those apps you hate can be uninstalled. Heck you never have to use them if you don't want to. The new splash page is nothing more than a fancy start menu on a desktop. That's like saying "God damn OSX, it's so terrible. mail.app is the worst! I'm uninstalling OSX right now!". Or "Stupid linux, I hate 'Empathy' it's so dumb! I'm going to uninstall linux right now!'. Either you have no idea what you're doing or you're just looking to start a flame war.

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>> As a desktop operating system, it’s annoying, frustrating, irritating, and baffling to use.

I could not agree more. I share your frustration and befuddlement on just how abysmal a user experience Windows 8 is on the desktop.

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Most comments against the writter fail in three points:

a) You can have a nice prolific computer use without having to use shortcuts in most other OSes. Forcing someone to go back to use shortcuts is a step back.

b) OS is not the kernel, but both the kernel and the apps that makes the computer usable. In the past that meant only Comand instructions, but long ago lots of basic apps (email reader, browser, calendar, messenger... has become part of the system). You can change them, sure. But if you had decent workable apps and now you have less decent less workable apps, that is a step back.

c) MS is changing its interface. Metro is the new one. Metro is what Windows 8 has to be valuated by. Desktop should be there only to help the move from one to the other. But it doesn't look like.

I value MS for trying to make a change for the first time in their history. And I like the mook ups. But right now Win8 is little more than a mockup (surely the release of next month will be much more polished).

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Windows 8 is a huge transition and is not for those who are opposed to change. Don't like it? Stick to 7 and quit complaining. Your too old to adjust, and have began to stagnate.

Most of your complaints seem to be about the Metro apps. Mail, messaging, calender, music, etc are granted not the best. I have a very good feeling that in time, either Microsoft will update these to be truly useful, or a third party dev will blow them out of the water.

I've used Windows 8 since RC, and although it took some getting use to, it also depends on how you use the OS. The desktop is not a "Metro App". FFS, the new "Start Menu" is far from a shell.

In terms of compatibility, I am a developer who does both .NET, C# (which of course Visual Studio 2012 handles like a dream), as well as open source Rails development with Postgres. All of these development environments easily setup and configured. I even have native commands from the $PATH working in PowerShell.

I game too; Diablo 3, Starcraft 2, EQ, etc. All work.

UI response is snappy, and the new look is great.

In short; if you cannot figure out basic hot keys (Windows key + Tab switches from Metro to desktop) (Ctrl+Alt+Del = shutdown menu ) and are opposed to change, then either stick with Windows 7 or exchange your dignity for a Mac; you are no longer relevant.

The rest of us will work on Windows 8. Computing in the past has made users feel like there are strict rules to using an OS and must follow certain procedures to do their tasks. With Windows 8, forget everything you use to know and just do whats natural; it works.

Search? Windows key (to open Metro start menu) and just START TYPING.

I like how Microsoft did not cater to the morons when creating this OS. If you look at how a moron works and design your tools after that then you will make tools for morons. But then you are actually a moron yourself.

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Who is the author of this "article"?? I think is someone that always do everything with the mouse and didn't use the keyboard for anything else than typing this kind of false statements.

I'm using Win8 Consumer Preview since the day it come out, on my 2 years old laptop. And I never had a problem, the OS is fast and fluid, I use it in my every day work as a web developer and use Eclipse, Flash Builder, Dreamweaver, VisualStudio, Office 2010 also I can play Diablo 3 and SC2 with not a single issue. On the metro apps side I use the People, Messaging, Music, Weather, Vimeo, Remote Desktop almost every day and to switch between them is just easy... the same way I've been doing it for years alt+tab or winkey+tab.

I don't see myself going back to Win7.

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And this is why I will never visit this website again. Journalism at it's worst.

I don't care about Windows 8, but this is just appalling. Good day.

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OMG XD

LIES LIES LIES LIES LIES

You don't know how to use Windows 8, and trust me, is the easiest Windows to use... you are so asshole

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Sounds like a CS player to me. I bet he still has XP and Counter Strike installed as his main OS and Game.

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Oh, and for what it's worth I've been using Windows 8 on and off for the past 9 months, and the RTM since it hit MSDN. I agree pretty much wholeheartedly with everything in this article - it is simply dreadful.

The only way to make the OS even remotely usable is to stick on Classic Shell at which point you basically have a slightly buggier and uglier version of Windows 7 with a very nice file copy dialogue.

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Fun fact, when you click "Shut down" the PC isn't shut down - the user is logged out and the system is hibernated.

Windows then does not like it if you then go and change any hardware while the system is 'shut down'.

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If I remember correctly, you can disable Metro and use a Windows 8 version of what looks like Windows 7. That is just what I heard from a friend who works in IT of course. If that's true, then I've little care for the Metro bit - its just a fun little thing they did as far as I am concerned. However, if it is just pure and simply Windows 8, then I won't be bothering with it.

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Seriously? Worst whiner I've seen in some time, and has to be the least competent review of an OS I've seen in some time. This is a gaming site according to the URL, so it's weird that you come off as a badly disguised Apple Fanboy. I guess you're just an angry tween...

Won't be coming back to a site that promotes shit like this, there are enough gaming sites out there to not have to be exposed to this poor level of "journalism".


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