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Game industry veterans launch mental health charity Safe in Our World

Today is World Mental Health Day, and also the launch day of a new charity dedicated to raising awareness about mental health issues in the gaming community and promoting positive change in the videogame industry. Called Safe in Our World, the charity brings some veterans and ambassadors of the videogame world on board to help get some initiatives up and running which aim to support players worldwide.

Announced in a press release today, Safe in Our World has a mission to “create an online destination where people can seek help, gain access to resources and information, and discover stories from real people within and surrounding the games industry.” The charity is also looking to destigmatise mental health conditions, enabling conversations on the subject, and help players, pros, and creators to come together to support eachother.

The first initiative the charity has in the works is to “highlight mental health issues through vital exposure in gaming experiences.” This begins with ‘Fractured Minds,’ a puzzle-based title that explores the positive effects videogames can have on players, as well as depicting its BAFTA award-winning designer Emily Mitchell’s own experiences of mental health issues.

The game, published by Wired Productions, will head to PC (plus other platforms) soon, and is priced at £1.59 ($1.99/€1.99). 80% of all game profits made will be split evenly between “a private fund for Emily’s future and to support Safe In Our World initiatives which will help others.”

Safe in Our World was founded by videogame industry veterans Gareth Williams, Leo Zullo, and Neil Broadhead, and with support from Aaron Cooper and Al Hibberd. The charity’s also got a bunch of partners backing it. You can check out more details about the team, partners, and work behind the charity on the Safe in Our World website here.

Leo Zullo, the chair and trustee of the charity, says, “The video games industry creates worlds for a huge number of vulnerable people, and it is our duty to help and support them. We can reach them and share this message if we work together; we can actually make a difference.”

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