"There’s no market for a $2000 device that requires a dedicated room" - Take-Two boss on VR | PCGamesN

"There’s no market for a $2000 device that requires a dedicated room" - Take-Two boss on VR

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The CEO of Rockstar's parent company, Take-Two, has spoken out against VR, claiming there's no market for the devices currently.

If you have a VR headset, which you probably don't, why not check out our list of the best VR games.

“It’s way too expensive right now,” Zelnick told attendees at the Cowen and Company Technology, Media & Telecom Conference, via Gamespot. “There is no market for a $2000 entertainment device that requires you to dedicate a room to the activity.

“I don’t know what people could be thinking. Maybe some of the people in this room have a room to dedicate to an entertainment activity, but back here in the real world? That’s not what we have in America.

“We have like $300 to spend on an entertainment device and we do not have a dedicated room. We don’t have something where you stand in a big open space and hold two controllers with something on your head - and not crash into the coffee table. We don’t have that.” 

This comment sits in contrast to the view of a developer at Eve creators CCP, who recently told us enthusiasts will make the effort for VR.  

"Everyday people do an enormous number of ridiculously complex and difficult things just to get through their day. Like cooking - that requires an entire room in your house and a special machine to keep things cold; and then you've gotta have this thing that makes these super-hot surfaces," said Adam Kraver, architect programmer on Project Arena for CCP, during Eve Fanfest.

"So if you're passionate about that you can do [VR]. If you're passionate about this and interested in this, you're just gonna do it."

Perhaps Zelnick will feel differently once the tech advances over the next few years.

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RogDolos avatarPsycold avatarMrAptronym avatarFattox avatarBraveToaster avatarMountain_Man avatar+2
Psycold Avatar
94
1 Year ago

Already 1 out of every 1000 steam users has a Vive, and that is pretty damn good considering they just launched a month ago. V.R. is bringing people to PC like the second coming of Jebus.

3
NihlusGreen Avatar
657
1 Year ago

Where did you read that?

1
DuoBlaze Avatar
98
1 Year ago

It's actually 1 out of every 1,000 "active" steam users. It doesn't take into account people who for example have steam installed but never use it or rarely play games via steam. The stat is pulled from steam's own public stats database.

2
RogDolos Avatar
13
1 Year ago

Hahah! Well I guess tell that to Valve. There was "no market" for Steam when it launched too. Now all these other companies complain about not having a foothold in that space. This is how companies get left behind, waiting for the market to come instead of creating it.

Love, love, love my Vive and everyone else who I've had in my living room to try it has been pretty amazed too. Worth every penny.

2
Fattox Avatar
465
1 Year ago

He's right about the price, but it's a price he seems to be pulling from thin air. Or is he including a VR-ready PC, along with the headset, in that definition of "device"?

That's like including the price of a TV in the argument for/against a console. Sure, you need one. But you probably already have the former if you're thinking of buying the latter.

2
MrAptronym Avatar
361
1 Year ago

Just because one idea took off doesn't mean every idea will. There was no market for 3D TVs either... and there still kind of isn't.

The difference is that steam had a very low barrier to entry and it served primarily to make things more connected and easier. Anyone could get it for free and run it on practically any PC. It makes buying games easier, no need to go out to a store and purchase something, no need to search around online. It makes chatting with people in a game easier. It makes managing your games easier. (I will also note that general consensus was already that people would increasingly just download their games. Valve making the one stop shop was the surprise.)

Steam very much follows other successes such as Amazon, Facebook and smartphones. Humans want convenience, they want ease of use and they want to connect with one another.

Here are my issues with VR: First of all, it is extremely expensive still. It is outside the price range of a huge swath of the market. Secondly, it is inconvenient. VR headsets block you out from the world and require, when enabled with motion controls, a large amount of empty space. (which many people do not have) VR headsets could be turned into a great way to connect with others in the future, but for now they primarily isolate people.

Additionally, steam had Half-life 2 to help it take off. VR doesn't have a must have experience yet. Most of what I have seen has been impressive only because the VR kits are novel and fun themselves. Many are still glorified tech demos.

Technologies that supposedly make games more immersive have historically had a hard time catching on. I basically play my games the same way I did in 1994, in spite of all the fads that have come and gone. Lots of people own train controllers and steering wheels and other peripherals but I would hardly say they have taken off.

I think VR will eventually take off, though the stigma of wearing a mask will be very hard to break. I mean glasses alone were a major killer for 3D TV.

2
MrAptronym Avatar
361
1 Year ago

I am in agreement. I could always be wrong, but as impressive as it is, I don't see VR taking off yet.

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Mountain_Man Avatar
731
1 Year ago

I think VR will always fall into the specialty hardware niche like steering wheels, flight controllers, and articulated chairs. While some people will put the effort and expense into it, I suspect the majority of the public will simply ignore it once the novelty wears off.

3
MrAptronym Avatar
361
1 Year ago

Yup, that is about how I feel. There is definitely a hardcore enthusiast market out there, I just do not see it breaking into mainstream right now.

1
BraveToaster Avatar
326
1 Year ago

I don't think it'll take off yet, but just like that guy up there talking about how there was no market for Steam at first, I think it'll be a bit like that. The technology is still really expensive and takes a ton of power to run at good frames. Everyone I know who has tried it says it's pretty mind blowing. I think once the headsets are cheaper, and hardware is more powerful, the market will really start to open up. Also I think Facebook is gonna try their hardest to make some profit off the $2 billion they spent on Oculus.

1
MrAptronym Avatar
361
1 Year ago

I don't buy the steam comparison, but I think VR could certainly open up eventually. I think there are space issues, and I am not sure the idea of wearing a mask for long periods of time has widespread appeal right now, but I don't think VR's eventual success seems unreasonable. I just do not think it is inevitable.

1