We speak to Denuvo, whose Anti-Tamper Tech may have left piracy dead in the water | PCGamesN

We speak to Denuvo, whose Anti-Tamper Tech may have left piracy dead in the water

Assassin's Creed 4 piracy

Earlier this week the cracking collective 3DM announced that they would no longer be attempting to unshackle single-player games from their DRM protection, leaving the piracy scene for at least a year to assess the repercussions it has on videogame sales. 

That's 3DM's own spin on the fact that they're entering a hiatus, at least. The last big announcement from the China-based group was of their frustration trying to get around Denuvo's Anti-Tamper Tech to crack Just Cause 3, so it seems at least possible that there might be another narrative at play causing 3DM to withdraw from videogame piracy.  

You know which games you don't have to pirate? The best free PC games. Check them out, and be done with this piracy business.

Austria-based Denuvo first demonstrated their Anti-Tamper Tech in the wild to protect EA's FIFA 15 from piracy. Historically the FIFA games attracted huge levels of piracy prior to 15, regularly making the top ten most pirated games lists.  ATT was so effective that EA also enlisted Denuvo to protect Dragon Age: Inquisition from piracy, likewise City Interactive's Lords of the Fallen.

On 1st December 2014, 3DM made a breakthrough. "After 15 days of work, the 64bit version of Denuvo has been cracked," they announced in a statement on their site. "This hints at FIFA 15, DA:I, and Lords of the Fallen being ready for release in the near future.”

True to their word, 3DM released a cracked version of Dragon Age: Inquisition two weeks after the game was shipped.

But the fact Denuvo's Anti-Tamper Tech was eventually circumvented isn't really the point, sales & marketing director Thomas Goebl tells me: "We do not position our Anti-Tamper solution as uncrackable, only hard to crack."

It might seem a minor point, but it's very telling about the relationship piracy groups have with anti-piracy measures. SecuROM and SafeDisc, both on the front line of the fight at from 2008 to present, were a gauntlet laid down to pirates.

Bypassing them was a challenge, and a means of voicing discontent to what many percieved to be a shady practice that infringed on people's rights - Maryland resident Melissa Thomas filed a successful class-action lawsuit against EA for their implementation of SecuROM in Spore in 2008.

Spore

Denuvo's strategy is smarter. On one hand their admission that ATT is theoretically possible to crack diminishes the bravado of the traditional relationship between pirates and anti-piracy companies, so that there are fewer bragging rights for the cracker who manages it.

On the other hand, the apparently laborious nature of cracking ATT keeps the game safe from piracy for at least the first few days after its release, when potential sales are at their highest. "Our focus is to help publishers to secure the initial sales windows of their games," says Goebl, "hence delaying piracy."

The idea of pirated copies as lost sales has long been contested, and perhaps the best illustration of the vagueness of that relationship comes from Just Cause 3 and The Witness. The former deployed Denuvo's ATT and enjoyed much of its opening week on PC piracy free. The latter did not, and by creator Jonathan Blow's admission was heavily pirated:

Blow also revealed that The Witness made somewhere in the region of $5 million in its opening week across both PC and PS4. Using SteamDB's data to cross check that figure (while keeping in mind that it's by no means gospel), that $5 million checks out: 71,000 current Steam owners who paid $40 each equals $2.84 million dollars of PC revenue to date, just over half the figure Blow estimated across both platforms. 

Just Cause 3 meanwhile, according to SteamDB, currently has 508,000 Steam users.

There are obvious flaws in comparing those two figures. They're two different types of game, marketed with different budgets, appealing to different audiences, released at different times of the year.

But the disparity of those numbers, coupled with the reported high piracy rate of one and reported anti-piracy success of another... well, it's at least enough for someone to entertain the idea that there might be a relationship between sales and piracy.

thewitness.jpg

And the effect Denuvo's software is having on that relationship is attracting a growing number of publishers. Konami used ATT to safeguard Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, EA for Battlefield: Hardline, FIFA 16, and Star Wars Battlefront. Square Enix used ATT for Rise of the Tomb Raider after Just Cause 3's release, too.

It's popular, then. And it seems to be having a tangible impact on the industry. 3DM are by no means the only cracking group out there, but they are a big name in the field.

The question is: what are Denuvo doing differently? How are they succeeding where previous anti-piracy measures have failed.

"We see three major differences," Goebl tells me. "Our solution is very secure, has no extra hurdles for the paying consumer, no negative impact on the in-game performance [or] experience, and is easy to apply by the development studios."

That statement's especially interesting, because it implicitly references the issues many vocalised - sometimes in the courtroom - about SecuROM. And in turn, that's interesting because Denuvo and SecuROM are one and the same. 

"Denuvo is the new company formed from the management buyout of the Sony DADC DigitalWorks team," reads the 'who are we?' section of the company's official site. "The team that developed best-of-breed copy protection like SecuROM for games and Screen Pass for movies."

That changes the narrative about anti-piracy. This isn't the story of a new company succeeding where others have failed by applying their brave new strategy. It's about the old company learning from their mistakes and eventually besting their old foe. 

"Regarding security," Goebl continues, "our protection [produces] these good results [because] we created a very dedicated, niche product for Windows-based games on Steam, Origin and alike. By comparison, most other Anti-Tamper providers are less focused and offer a wide range of OS and programming language support."

Whether 3DM return in February 2017 and resume their activities remains to be seen. Whether their hiatus has a noticeable effect on PC game sales is also anyone's guess, and that's the more interesting half of the equation. Meanwhile, Denuvo will continue to make Anti-Tamper Tech more difficult to circumvent. 

The war between the old foes might not be over, but it appears as though it's at least winding down, and the pirates are not flying their flags victoriously. 

Subnautica
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LordCrash avatar[GM] SocietyX avatarhuldu avatar*sigh* avatarrotekz avatarwuweird avatar+14
[GM] SocietyX Avatar
169
2 Years ago

I don't think there's any real change happening. It's true Denuvo has thrown up some new barriers but other groups besides 3dm are already finding their own solutions to circumvent it and someone always wants to step up to fill the void regardless..

That being said, I still don't believe piracy has a significant impact on actual sales. Games that features NO DRM, such as Witcher 3, are selling like hot cakes because they build the value of their product. Did lots of people still pirate it? Sure they did. But I think those people never intended to buy the game to begin with.

8
LordCrash Avatar
140
2 Years ago

There is nobody able to crack Denuvo at the moment. Neither 3dm nor anybody else...

And of course there are multiple reasons why people pirate games. Of course not 100% of the pirates would have bought the game otherwise. But it's illusional to think that nobody would have. That's just not how human behaviour works in general. We're not all pefectly honest and morally upright people, far from it. That's why we have laws and such things. To prevent people from doing bad things which we do all the time. In the same vein anti tamper solutions like Denuvo try to prevent people to use and enjoy games they haven't legally aquired. And that in itself is a good thing.

-1
MrAptronym Avatar
361
2 Years ago

It is true that its a good thing to have less piracy, but my issue is whether it is worth the downsides to me the consumer. I have bought games with DRM in the past that caused real issues for me, and I now worry about whether some of the games I own can even be played in a decade. I am far less inclined to buy a game with DRM than one that is DRM free these days. If DRM is gets cracked I at least can grab a back-up copy.

So yeah, I am 100% against piracy. I like to support developers as much as possible, but I am also against DRM.

5
Aever Avatar
659
2 Years ago

Pretty well said.

3
KeefBaker Avatar
393
2 Years ago

I'm really anti-piracy but I'm totally with you on this. If I want to play a game from 1994, I can. But a number of games are getting to the point where the creators can't be arsed to keep the DRM servers on or have gone bust/used 3rd party stuff like GFWL etc.

And then the only way to get them working if the devs can't be bothered is community patches.

I suppose the other thing is, internet connections break, especially where I live and that basically means I can't play the games with the online DRM.

When it comes down it though people will always want something for free and people still don't see piracy as theft so there you go.

2
BraveToaster Avatar
326
2 Years ago

"There is nobody able to crack Denuvo at the moment. Neither 3dm nor anybody else..."

uhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

1
jjit Avatar
3
2 Years ago

Denuvo 2.0

like FIFA 16, Just Cause 3, Tomb Raider: The Rise

1
BraveToaster Avatar
326
BraveToaster replied to jjit
2 Years ago

Oh yeah. Those aren't cracked. Yet.

1
LordCrash Avatar
140
2 Years ago

That's just a fact AT THE MOMENT.

0
BraveToaster Avatar
326
BraveToaster replied to LordCrash
2 Years ago

Then why are there functioning cracks for Fifa 15, Lords of the Fallen, Dragon Age: Inquisition, Batman Arkham Knight, MGS V, etc etc?

3
AnAuldWolf Avatar
872
2 Years ago

Honestly, I think it's a bit of a scam. It's a big business that preys on the idiocy of suit encrusted executives that are worried about the bits of money that may fall through the tiny holes in their very large pockets. If I were less ethical, I'd wish I'd thought of it first.

It's like how Kaspersky has been caught releasing viruses that are designed to destroy the software of its competitors, yet easily removed by their own software.

Just like that, piracy is a boogeyman kept alive by DRM developers who can make easy money off of it. If someone's going to buy a game, they'd buy it anyway. If they're in a financial situation where they can't, they won't.

Short of mind control, that won't ever change.

1
wuweird Avatar
28
2 Years ago

Are you really going to compare sales of two fundamentally different types of games to make a vague generalist claim? That makes sense.

5
Fattox Avatar
465
2 Years ago

Also "game that was 'uncracked' was not pirated, game that was DRM free was pirated". Well, yeah... not much point pirating a game you won't be able to play.

1
LordCrash Avatar
140
2 Years ago

Well, can small developers even afford to implement Denuvo into their games? And if they can't (either because of financial restraints or because their core audience expects a DRM-free release) doesn't such a bullet-proof solution cause the market to become even more unfair? At least it's a distortion of the market with imo wanted and unwanted effects, a complex situation with winners and losers alike.

2
AnAuldWolf Avatar
872
2 Years ago

If you realise, of course, that the boogeyman of piracy is all a scam, then it becomes a different matter entirely. You can read comic books online, and yet recently Marvel has been bragging about how currently they're experiencing a comic book boom and they're doing better than they ever have before.

The people who would pirate even if they had the money is below 1 per cent of the potential base of customers. You're left with 99 per cent. That's true of any industry, really.

The only people who won't pay otherwise are those who can't. In which case we need a more intelligent system of dynamic pricing which accounts for a person's ability to pay. If, for example, a poorer person only had to pay a tenth of the price, whilst someone well off perhaps had to pay four or five times the price? You'd end up with many more customers. And the amount of profit overall would still average out.

More customers means your base of available consumers grows through the best system of advertising available to anyone: Word of mouth.

We don't have that, yet, though. So people unable to pay are... unable to pay! Imagine that! Yes, some of them may pirate, but that's not a lost sale. That's a person in poverty trying to find intellectual stimulation and some amount of happiness. Or would you rather they live in misery along with their poverty? Would you offer to buy these people things instead?

It's an ethical matter, really. So those who can pay, will pay. Those who can pay that won't pay are of such a trivial number that they're not worth considering. And those who can't pay, can't pay.

When you realise the logic of this, you'll understand why piracy is just a boogeyman. If anything, piracy helps by increasing your base of available consumers. Until dynamic pricing happens, this is probably the best way for things to work. Even if those who both don't and can't pay enjoy pirated content? Well, they're still going to advertise for you and help spread the word to more people who can pay.

Economics. Logic. Ethics.

Piracy really is just a boogeyman that exists to sell DRM to idiots.

1
*sigh* Avatar
286
2 Years ago

So are we going to have problems running these games in 5- 10 years when brought legally? I'm guessing yes. Denuvo uses a server call back.

So what ever, use it if you can afford it. But never buy the game further down the track, cause youll never be able to play it.

2
LordCrash Avatar
140
2 Years ago

I don't see that as a real issue. 5-10 year old PC games are usually offered DRM-free on services like GOG for less than 5 bucks anyway.

If you want to play a game now, buy it. If you want to play it again in a few years you can always buy it againt for almost nothing if there are any issues with your original copy. There doesn't need to be any fear that you won't be able to play it again anymore in our digital times.

0
MrAptronym Avatar
361
2 Years ago

Most games from five years ago are not available on DRM free services like GOG. A small selection make it. I am also not particularly interested in having games I paid for suddenly stop working an hoping for a chance I can pay for the privilege of owning them again.

In the modern digital era there is more reason than ever to fear not being able to play your games. Plenty of games rely on third party services that can just be shut down when not profitable. Multiplayer games are of course the most obvious here, but something could of course make Valve/Steam or Origin or whatever service shut down permanently and then you'd be in trouble. Or one of these services could implement something you find shady and basically you would have to go along with it or lose your games. What if one of your games is updated and they mess up the game for you? In the modern digital era, people who buy software have less control than ever.

That said, I am very against piracy. I am happy when a game gets cracked a bit after release though because I can at least then rest assured I can obtain and keep a copy that I can use on my own terms.

3
Aever Avatar
659
2 Years ago

That's an incredibly silly thing to say. One because not all games make to GoG and two, because it implies I need to buy the game again. So yes, it is a big fracking issue and one of the reasons why I always say "frack DRM".

3
Aever Avatar
659
2 Years ago

That's an incredibly silly thing to say. One because not all games make to GoG and two, because it implies I need to buy the game again. So yes, it is a big fracking issue and one of the reasons why I always say "frack DRM".

DRM is never going to be convenient or even safe for us, legit customers.

1
Fattox Avatar
465
2 Years ago

But why should i have to pay again?

If i want to play an old VHS movie, i can throw it in my VHS player. I don't necessarily need to go and buy the Bluray edition.

And with PC games, outside of compatibility (helped by things like DOSBOX), there shouldn't be any barriers. Especially not from DRM.

Otherwise, the only people who lose are the people who pay/paid in the first place.

1
AnAuldWolf Avatar
872
2 Years ago

Do you work for a DRM company, LordClash? You're setting off all of my false flag alarms with illogical, specious arguments.

The fact is is that there are games that have bugs on modern systems cause by how they had to be cracked that aren't -- as Mr. Aptronym points out -- available officially for purchase anywhere. And the nature of the bugs introduced by those cracks means they likely never will be.

Here's what you either don't know or don't want others to realise: GoG.com uses cracks. All the time. I'm not joking, I've seen the work of crackers in their stuff, and I think they've even admitted to it on a bunch of occasions. And funnier, when companies have released patches that finally remove the CD requirement or DRM from a game, they'll often roll a crack into that patch. I remember one famous instance of that where UbiSoft used a Reloaded crack for Rainbow Six Vegas 2. Funny stuff. That was all about the news, but even when it isn't, this is a common practise if the crack is good.

If the crack is good.

But there are games that can't be cracked well and have lots of bugs introduced via cracks, as I've said. Ten years down the road we may be left with horribly buggy games thanks to systems like Denuvo. All over a faux cause, a boogeyman like 'piracy.' Denuvo, of course, laughing all the way to the bank.

-1
jjit Avatar
3
2 Years ago

game company can release patch

official remove DRM after few years

0
AnAuldWolf Avatar
872
2 Years ago

And how often does this happen, exactly?

And how often, then, does it happen without actually using a third party crack to do that? (See the Rainbow Six Vegas 2 example above.)

1
Fight Aaaaaah Avatar
3
7 Months ago

Take a look at how many games still have GFWL…

1
rotekz Avatar
16
2 Years ago

I would be far more interested in knowing the performance overheads of Denuvo through 3rd party tests.

2
AnAuldWolf Avatar
872
2 Years ago

LordCrash actually has it right, this time. You can't compare without an uncontaminated version to test against.

This hasn't stopped 'tests' from showing up on the Internet, though, 'proving' that the DRM doesn't actually eat SSDs or cause performance issues.

Sigh. People are gullible. Don't fall for that. Just assume that on average there's going to be some performance overhead. Anywhere between 2 and 20 per cent depended on how well or poorly it's implemented and how demanding the game is by itself. And assume that you'll be looking at hardware damaged, based on what's all ready happened to the unfortunate souls reporting it.

1
Mind Avatar
1
2 Years ago

It actually happens sometimes. My friend had his burner flashed by DRM, totally bricked it. So thats what you get. I tend to avoid games with copy protections. It's not worth it. I support games without them and indie developers. The reality is, the potential bugs and overhead of DRM affects one group. Paying customers. They would be paying anyway. DRM is so unnecessary in that way. Just simply remove it, don't do DRM. I think it has been proven over and over by brave game developers and indie developers that dare to sell games without DRM that it is indeed possible to make games and profit from it without resorting to DRM.

1
LordCrash Avatar
140
2 Years ago

Not possible since you needed a Denuvo-free version of the very same game which doesn't exist. But I don't see why a solution that only protects the exe file from being tampered should cause serious performance overhead.

0
MrAptronym Avatar
361
2 Years ago

I dislike piracy, but I do hope these get cracked in time. My main two concerns with DRM are security and archival.

I want to make sure the games I spend good money on today can be played ten or twenty years from now. DRM generally makes that hard to guarantee, which makes sense because companies don't really care about preserving their works as much as ensuring their maximum profit right now. (Can't fault that really, they are companies) When I purchase a game on steam, especially with additional DRM I feel like I have very little control over it.

Update I don't like? Too bad. Some service goes offline? What a shame. EULA changes? No choice. PC gamers have long dealt with being unable to resell or even effectively refund purchases. Refunds have gotten better lately, but now companies are putting us less in control of the software we buy, more in line with what console gamers deal with.

So I am plenty happy when these services get cracked so that I have an option for back-up or to avoid what I might consider a privacy or security risk. I suppose the companies don't care if they get their launch window pirate free. In any case, I give preference with my limited budget to games without DRM. I think its something important to continue to fight for.

2
jjit Avatar
3
2 Years ago

game company can release patch

to official remove DRM after few years

so DRM-free if service goes offline

1
MrAptronym Avatar
361
2 Years ago

They can, but I don't trust them to and wouldn't rely on it. They don't have any real incentive to do so. If anything its good for them to have people only playing their latest games.

1
AnAuldWolf Avatar
872
2 Years ago

Again: How often does this happen?

Again: How often does this happen without the developer in question using a third-party crack? (See the Rainbow Six Vegas 2 example above.)

You've no reason to have faith in this. Why do you?

1
AnAuldWolf Avatar
872
2 Years ago

It can also lead to people avoiding games that have it.

I've avoided games with it. Why? Well... StarForce. The last time we saw claims like this were with that. A DRM system that installed with RING0 access (very identity-theft friendly for any unscrupulous fraudsters!), and it set drives to PIO mode. The ongoing truth of DRM? It only hurts the paying consumer.

And lo, there are rumours of Denuvo destroying hard drives and SSD drives. Do I believe it? Heh. Securon's been responsible for that. StarForce obviously has. It wouldn't surprise me at all to find out that there's yet another suspect wreaking havoc on the data of the unwitting, unwary, unprepared, and unsuspecting. There's a special naivete in the belief that any big company cares about the safety of your computer. Look at the sordid, morbid history of StarForce and the mountains of evidence it took to bring them down.

To me, Denuvo is just another StarForce. I tend to avoid it as best I can. Another truth? Speaking as someone with at least a little knowledge in the field, you can trust verified crackers more than you can trust DRM. It's why if there's a game with DRM I really want, I'll likely buy it, then crack it. It's safer, it's healthier, and overall my computer is happier.

There are forms of DRM I'm okay with, but mostly those are authentication systems like Steam. If I have to choose between logging on every once in a while or opening my system up to hackers and risking hardware damage? I really know which I'd pick. Every time.

I just think that it's important that people be clued in about this. It's not that they're some kind of glorious vanguard against the evils of piracy. They are a company. A company's purpose is to make as much profit as quickly as possible in as great a quantity as possible. And unless they're caught red-handed, they won't always have your interests at heart. Like I said: StarForce.

A class action lawsuit was brought against Ubisoft for using it.

http://consumerist.com/2006/04/05/5m-starforce-class-action-lawsuit/

And this was rather swiftly followed by UbiSoft swearing off the DRM forever more.

http://arstechnica.com/uncategorized/2006/04/6603-2/

I don't doubt that Denuvo is going to end up having done something stupid as well. Often 'rumours' of software doing damage to computers shouldn't be ignored, they should be thoroughly investigated. And, frankly, the false flag efforts I've seen around various sites with people posting misleading tests 'proving' Denuvo's innocence a bit back left me even more perturbed.

So make of that what you will. I know piracy is seen as this great evil, but like I said, I'd rather crack a game I've paid for than revel in blissful ignorance, only to have to replace hardware later.

2
Fight Aaaaaah Avatar
3
7 Months ago

Ubisoft only swore off StarForce, not DRM. Proof: they use Denuvo.

1
AnAuldWolf Avatar
872
2 Years ago

And on top of what I've said about the whole piracy thing being a scam? Perhaps it's just the social worker in me talking but I don't think there's any harm in allowing the impoverished or disabled to enjoy a little intellectual stimulation. Consider that they might spend a time saving for a console that you would consider ridiculous, and then they'd have to buy expensive games for it.

Call it a bleeding heart if you will. But, to me, caring for the needs of the impoverished and the disabled in both physical AND mental capacities is just ethics, compassion, and human bloody decency in my book. Though there's not a whole lot of any of those to go around, these days. I'm not sure there ever was. It's realisations like that that make it difficult for me to flatter the human species, and almost impossible to stave off general misanthropy. At least toward the well abled and lucky.

All too many times I've heard enough about how the disabled are stealing money, the lack of good sentiment has dropped so severely that we're at a point where we laugh at seeing disabled people being abused in films. I'm looking at you, Guardians of the Galaxy, and your treatment of amputees.

Humans are sensitive, social creatures, so to be soundly mocked all the time isn't fun. We're also intellectual, inquisitive creatures so it's a fallacy to say that if you're caring for a person's physical needs, then your job is done.

If a person is suffering crippling fibromyalgia (look it up), or has a chronic panic condition linked to brain damage which causes sham rage (look it up) so they can't even go outdoors? These are people who're going to be very bored, and very suicidal. Do I care about a fatcat lining his pockets versus the happiness of those who're tortured just by living on a daily basis? Not really.

Then again, I'm a good human being. I'm the rarest of breeds.

2
JarateMan Avatar
2
2 Years ago

Trust me, whoever cracks Denuvo will have "bragging rights" as you say in your article. Also, you're a moron if you really believe you can compare sales of Just Cause 3 to The Witness, in any shape, way, or form. Another game you mentioned tho, Metal Gear Solid 5 would have been a better comparrison to use with JC3. Metal Gear was pirated, and still has over 930,000 users according to steamdb. How's that comparrison?

2
huldu Avatar
251
2 Years ago

Just because a person would pirate a game doesn't mean that they would have bought the game. That's where all the logic fails. If there are what 5 million pirated versions of a game does not translate to 5 million lost sales. I'm just looking at that Witness as an example, I never even heard about the game until someone was streaming it - a complete playthrough. Why buy someone when I can watch someone entertaining play it through? Piracy seems like it's dying and denuvo sure seems to put a nail in the coffin but the next problem would be the streamers. Publishers and developers will always be complaining about something at the end of the day, if it isn't piracy I can guarantee you they'll go heavy down on streamers.

1
AnAuldWolf Avatar
872
2 Years ago

Anti-piracy campaigners and logic don't go hand in hand, friend. They never do.

I've never heard so much nonsense outside of a convention for car salesmen. It's very silly. I pointed out above that there are arguments as to why piracy isn't a problem, but is even beneficial.

I'll try and go over them again for the sake of clarity.

You have three groups to consider.

1. Those who can pay, who will pay.

2. Those who can pay, who won't pay.

3. Those who can't pay, and thus won't pay.

Group 2 is always small. Proof? Comic books are the most easy thing to pirate, since they're just images. And currently Marvel is bragging about a comic book boom, that things are better for them than they've ever been. Group 2 isn't very big, if it was, no one would be able to make money.

Group 1 buys whatever they want, within their budget.

Group 3? Well, they can't buy. They live in poverty so they're unable to do so. And thus they pirate, to avoid the misery and lack of intellectual stimulation. However, these people can then take to tumblr to talk about their experiences and swell the consumer base. Adding more and more people to group 1.

The fact that Youtube streaming is not only allowed but encouraged helps to add weight to this. If a person who can't afford to buy the game decides to talk about it on social media, or upload a video, they're advertising for free. It's a great service, because word of mouth sells the most of anything.

http://www.referralcandy.com/blog/word-of-mouth-marketing-strategy/

And that's why marketing companies are trying (badly) to replicate it, to make some kind of money out of it. Though every once in a while one of them does something incredible and gets it right. (See the new Sonic the Hedgehog PR guy on Twitter, it's incredible. I genuinely think SEGA has lost their mind, in the best possible way.)

The thing is? Piracy does more to help than it can to harm. Though it's easy to be a snake oil salesman and cook up stories of lost profits to have clueless executives buy your DRM. DRM that does nothing to protect, and only harms the paying consumer. Hooray. The real crooks and criminals are DRM developers. That's always been the case.

And they're always ready to have one of their drones pop up to make an argument about how a poor person watching a movie online is the same as stealing their neighbour's car, taking it for a joyride, and crashing it in a lake.

Q.E.D.: Anti-piracy Campaigners and logic? They're mutually exclusive things.

1
Nolan80 Avatar
1
2 Years ago

Digital piracy≠Sea piracy like Somali pirates.This whole article is one big joke.

1
1N07 Avatar
417
2 Years ago

Delaying piracy is an interesting concept...

If only heavy duty DRM didn't often worsen the experience of paying customers it could be great.

You're never going to fully stop piracy with DRM, nor do I necessarily even want that (I do fundamentally believe that people should of course pay for their entertainment, but while I don't condone piracy, I believe there are sometimes good reasons for it), but if you could delay it for say, a week... That would have a huge positive impact on the industry as a whole, while still providing a copy for pirates and keeping them reasonably happy.

1
brainsgonedead Avatar
2
2 Years ago

I like how you put a shit game The Witness up against Just Cause 3! The sales of JC3 were crap on the consoles and on PC. That is because a lot said it was rubbish. Also Consoles games are pirated but it seems blaming the PC market is an easy get put of jail card really! I brought Rise of the tomb raider because I wanted to play it but once the crack gets released I will default to using that. I had a PC messed up and died thanks to Securom and would the game company buy me a new pc? No! So basically sod them! Also films cost millions to make yet a cinema ticket costs about £8 and a dvd/blu ray cost £15 so why the hell can a game not be this cheap? I've heard of markup prices but this takes the piss at 40 - 50 quid a game! Either make games that have long lasting playability or lower the damn prices! Console owners are like lost sheep they always follow what they get told to do! Pc market had brains and that is why piracy is always going to be there. Just to piss you off! If you want people to play the game offer a special discount on your opening week! If gog.com can sell drm free games why can't everyone else?

And lastly the stupid arse comments about not being rich are just fucking dumb! Does no one understand piracy is a bit of fun, I bet all of you on here stream pirated films or have downloaded films from a torrent or file sharing site! I bet even the bloody game designers have as well! I've not met one person since the web was invented who does not do anything illegal!

Stories like this are just bollocks! Suicide Bombers cost money! Pirates do not!

Fucking idiots!!! No such thing as a do gooder! If there is they're usually fucking up somewhere else! Bye..

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Verontier Avatar
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1 Year ago

You put The Witness in the same article as Just Cause 3 for sales comparison? REALLY?!?! So, Indie 3D puzzles and well established AAA action-adventure series games are comparable now? No disrespect to Jonathan Blow but the two should not even be mentioned on the same page. . .

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