In Untitled Goose Game’s timeline, “a goose chased Margaret Thatcher out of office” | PCGamesN

In Untitled Goose Game’s timeline, “a goose chased Margaret Thatcher out of office”

Untitled Goose Game

Untitled Goose Game takes place in a quaint UK village, and while no-one is in any doubt about the horrible-ness of that titular bird, it turns out that some people are making some unfair assumptions about the political leanings of those unfortunate villagers.

In a tweet last week, game developer Paolo Pedercini suggested that “I don’t feel bad about messing with the humans in Untitled Goose Game because I know they are all small-town Brexiters.” It’s a broad assumption, but one that does at least play on the fact that rural areas of the UK were more likely than urban areas to vote to leave the EU in the country’s 2017 referendum. As it turns out, however, it’s incorrect.

Pedercini tweeted at developer House House, asking them to confirm if “all the humans in the game are canonically Tories.” Perhaps there’s an unfair conflation there between Conservative Party voters and Leave voters, but I’m prepared to accept a reasonable amount of crossover in the name of some Twitter banter.

According to the developers, however, Pedercini’s assumption is incorrect, as Untitled Goose Game actually takes place in an alternate timeline. In that version of events, former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher wasn’t removed from office by members of her party, but by an angry goose that chased her out of Downing Street.

That kicked off a revolution spurred by the politics of far-left MP Tony Benn, as well as “the irreparable decline of the Tory party.” With no major right-wing influence in parliament, the British people drifted to the left, and, as a result, “the villagers are Marxists.”

So while the lovely day in the village might have been somewhat derailed by the actions of the terrible goose, I’d suggest that without Brexit and Bojo to worry about, the villagers are having a pretty good time of it.

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