How the deck is stacked against women in e-sports

Team Karma at ESWC

There’s no reason that e-sports should have to follow the path laid out by traditional sports.

There’s no reason why a pro gaming version of Ronda Rousey should ever be denied a chance to step into the ring with a male heavyweight, or why a group like the US Women’s National Team shouldn’t be able to compete for an unequivocal world title. There’s no reason, in other words, why women shouldn’t have as much presence and notoriety in e-sports as men.

But if you look at the landscape of competitive gaming, it’s overwhelmingly male-dominated. In its third year of existence, the League of Legends LCS has just had its first woman qualify for League’s highest tier of competition... and she has already stated her intention to step-down from her position before ever playing an LCS game. A form of international sporting competition where everyone is theoretically on equal-footing has resulted in a gender imbalance that places the professional scene far behind traditional sports when it comes to giving women space to compete, and an audience that cares about them.

The issue is multifaceted, of course, but in talking to women around e-sports, you could describe the issue as one of discouragement vs. encouragement. The former is why women are so hard to find at the highest level of gaming. The latter is why Counter-Strike has developed one of the strongest women’s e-sports communities that puts most other competitive games to shame.

99% invisible

“I don't want to use voice chat. It's worst on the more casual servers. As soon as they see I’m a girl, they have something to say,” explains Heather ‘sapphiRe’ Mumm, a Counter-Strike veteran with Team Karma whose career goes back to the game’s beginnings as a newly-acquired mod.

“They have missions in CS:GO now, and I had to do a mission on a casual server, which is really painful. But I was just going to do the mission, and I was doing well… and immediately I'm called a hacker. Because there's no way a girl could be that good. But, these people on a casual server who had just picked up the game couldn't believe I was destroying them. I don't change my handle anymore, but I refrain from putting it out there that I’m a female because I just don't want to deal with what they have to say.”

Heather Mumm at a tournament

Credit: HLTV.org

The single biggest reason for gender disparity within professional gaming is simple math, according to Mumm. Only a very small fraction of any population of players will be able to compete with the best of the best. Out of all the men who play Counter-Strike across Europe, how many develop competitive ambitions and start to pursue e-sports seriously? And of that number, how many are good enough to play on a Fnatic, or a Na’Vi, or a NIP? You’re talking about dozens of men by this point, perhaps fewer.

But women who play competitive games will face a lot more discouragement and harassment before ever making the decision to try and go pro. And it starts with the first encounters they have, on the lowest tiers of the ladder.

“I used to use the name Kaitlyn in SC2, and I just got so much random hate. I still use that name when I compete, but I don't use it online anymore,” says Kaitlyn Richelle, a professional StarCraft 2 player. “In CS:GO, when you get to higher levels… people get a lot less toxic. But when I'm trying to rank up and I'm starting on Gold Nova, people are insanely toxic if I ever say anything, or they're very patronizing. I stopped playing CS:GO. I do not play that game alone. I will not play that game alone, even though it was my second favorite game after StarCraft. I haven't played it for a year.

“People say, 'Well, everyone gets trolled. Everyone gets harassment.' But it's really bad. Anytime I would talk. I'm a strong person, and it still ended up affecting me.”

SC2 pro Kaitlyn

Credit: Cameron Baird / Red Bull Content Pool

What it takes

So it’s not surprising that fewer women overall choose to pursue competitive gaming. But the ones who do face even more obstacles, the foremost of which is: how on earth are you going to survive as a pro gamer?

Again, it’s hard for anyone to make a career in this realm. Most games can’t support more than a handful of full-time professionals at the highest level. Everyone else has to either get comfortable with poverty, or work a day-job, or find some other way to make gaming pay. And that often means streaming.

“Look at Twitch on some random night,” Mumm says. “Look at the top streamers. At least 50% of those are girls. And most of those girls are more there for entertainment, not really to show off their skill. So then… it's funny, because it's the guys who are giving these girls all these viewers, but it's also the guys saying, ‘Wow, I can't believe this girl has all these viewers. She's not even a good player. She doesn't deserve it.’”

There’s also a persistent distrust of women on streams. That they’re not being genuine, and are instead manipulating their audience. They are accused of living off the fact that they are ‘fake geek girls’ and taking advantage of a largely naive, heterosexual male audience.

Team Karma at ESWC 2015

Credit: Heather Mumm (personal photo)

But of course, Richelle points out, the same could be true for most of the men.

“Nearly all of the top male streamers are not competitive players. In fact, they're not particularly good at any game. A lot of them are silly. Goofy,” she contends. “But no-one is questioning whether they enjoy the game they're playing or not. People are constantly questioning me. They'll say to me, 'Kaitlyn, you're the only female streamer that I watch, because you're actually good at the game. You actually enjoy the game.' And it's funny, because people will say that's what they want: a girl that's good at the game. But then when you are good at the game, it's, 'No, you can't possibly be good at the game. You were boosted!'”

This is not an exaggeration. When women attain high levels of achievement in games, accusations of cheating or fraud are never far behind. Subreddits that will offer effusive congratulations to male pro gamers who reach a high skill tier will launch investigations of women who do the same thing.

Richelle went through the same thing when she reached Grandmaster in StarCraft 2. It’s a bitter memory, because it tainted an important milestone in her development as a player. It’s also an example of why women can’t just shrug off online harassment and misogyny. The stakes are too high, and too personal.

“I quit everything in my life. However much student debt I have, tens of thousands of dollars... I ruined personal relationships. All to pursue e-sports,” she reveals. “I’ve been doing this for years, making nowhere near as much money as I would working as an engineer. So when you're doing all this and you get Grandmaster, and you're so happy that you cry for 30 minutes, and then there's all these insane levels of hate? 'Just grow thicker skin’?! I quit everything for this. This isn't just a matter of growing thicker skin. That's insane. There's no way other people would be okay with this.”

At the summit

For Richelle, two years of working hard within e-sports hasn’t yielded a lot of great competitive opportunities. StarCraft 2 is a pretty dismal game for anyone outside of Korea who hopes to support themselves as a competitor. The best North American players struggle to reach a playoff bracket in most tournaments. Richelle, even as a Grandmaster, could not last a month if she relied on tournament winnings.

But it’s not winnings that sustain pro players. It’s sponsorship deals. Those require exposure, however, and most women who play StarCraft won’t get much more than the odd main-stage appearance at an open-bracket tournament, before the field gets narrowed down to the top players.

This is why Counter-Strike punches so far above its weight when it comes to the women’s scene. Counter-Strike has a tradition of women’s tournaments, thanks in large part to the Electronic Sports World Cup, which has run them for years. Women who play Counter-Strike at a high-level can expect to get time on stage, in front of a live audience and lots of stream viewers.

“You'll see as soon as a tournament is announced that there's all this roster news. ‘This organization picked up a female team, or these five girls came together.’ So I think it's really kind of the fact that these tournaments exist that drives teams to form,” Mumm says. “And you know a lot of these girls still play in online leagues against other males. But it's really the female events that drive all this. When sponsors ask what tournaments we want to go to, it's the female tournaments. Because that's where we play on the same stage as the men.”

Yet women-only events often get criticized for being somehow unfair. Because there are no meaningful biological differences when it comes to men and women playing a videogame, the argument goes, it unfairly aids women to give them a separate tournament.

Because they have their own competitive landscape, even it’s nowhere near as lucrative as men’s tournaments, women in Counter-Strike often hear that they don’t deserve to earn prize money from a tournament stocked with inferior teams. Or, if they play on a mixed-gender squad, that they didn’t deserve their roster spot and it should have gone to a more deserving (male) player.

“If I stumble,” Mumm explains, “it's, 'Go back to the kitchen. You shouldn't be playing.' If we got sponsorship and I got a mouse pad? 'You don't deserve that mouse pad. A better team deserves that mouse pad.' Every little thing.”

E-sports fans sometimes have a fixation on what certain people do or do not deserve. Perhaps it’s because in e-sports we can allow ourselves to believe uncritically in meritocracy. Game results are objective, so everyone should get exactly what they deserve according to their skill. That online gaming culture ends up alienating most women before they can ever contemplate going pro, or that it does not offer nearly as much support to women’s teams and players, is immaterial. Once the lobby timer counts down, the only question should be, ‘Who is better?’

The day may come when women’s tournaments are outmoded. But if we’re ever going to see the kind of gender parity that could make them obsolete, it will be in part thanks to women’s tournaments, because they encourage women to participate and raise their game. At the moment, however, they’re largely confined to Counter-Strike, which leaves lots of women who aspire to careers in e-sports out in the cold.

“When I was competing in women's tournaments, I actually felt more motivation to do better. You know, when someone is much better than you, you don't feel the same kind of motivation to get better. Then it feels like it's out of your reach,” says Richelle. “When there are other people that have a similar background and are better than you, but the gap is smaller, I think it's naturally more motivating. You can use that as a stepping stone. Women's tournaments are more of a stepping stone to get to a higher competitive level.”

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Tovias avatarDr Loxley avatarFraser Brown avatarKinth! avatarTehRawk avatarJezcentral avatar+22
Elfbarf Avatar
8
Elfbarf(16 hours played)
1 Year ago

I don't think you can really claim that sexism/discrimination is a huge factor in competitive games without first looking at the population data for them.

https://imgur.com/QwjTwT2

According to this info-graphic, the League of Legends playerbase is 90% male, and only 10% female. While this data was taken from 2012, I doubt it has changed significantly, though I can't find a more recent source with such information.

Dota 2 is even worse, with the playerbase being *96%* male and only 4% female.

Even SC2, which has had a few famous female players over the years is still 94% male. Of those female players, only Scarlett and ToSsGirL have ever defeated male opponents in competition (to my knowledge).

Professional players are an incredibly small minority in games like Dota, CS, and League, given that millions of people actively play the games, yet only a few hundred (realistically even less) will ever really become known at all in the competitive scene.

As far as harassment goes, it's definitely an issue, though to claim it exclusively targets women (or even targets them significantly more) just isn't accurate. Like many of my friends, I've been playing online games for the majority of the time that they've really existed. Trash talking has always existed, and if you do anything to stand out (and sometimes even if you don't), chances are you'll be a target at some point. Doing well in a game? Poorly skilled ragers will give you crap. Someone is dominating you? There's a good chance they'll be a cocky asshole. Developers have tried time and time again to find a solution to it, but ultimately, I just don't think it's possible without seriously limiting communication in games. No matter how much effort is put into improving an online gaming community, it will never become even remotely close to a "safe space" without putting up serious barriers to entry/having extremely strict moderation (which isn't realistic, reasonable, or possible).

Realistically, the easiest (and really, the only way) to overcome harassment in online games is to simply learn to ignore it. Some random asshole on CoD describing what they want to do to your mother just can't bother you, or you're simply letting them win. Your best bet is to either not let it get to you (and ignore it), or to simply mute/block them and move on.

The "fake geek girl" stereotype is an issue, though it's something that is fading and will continue to over time. Historically, video games have been a hobby that have catered primarily to men and boys as they have been (and continue to be) the majority of core video game players. Sure, you can point to statistics that show roughly equal gender representation of gamers, but those statistics include my mother as a gamer because she solves crosswords on her iPhone. In the past, many people viewed video games (outside of say, sports games and GTA) as something for lonely nerds, and while that stigma has definitely faded significantly in recent years, a lot of guys are (understandably) a bit resentful due to the harassment they've received in real life for their hobbies. When you're used to women dismissing you for your hobby, it's very easy to want to dismiss them for wanting to enter it. Is it wrong? Definitely, but once again, this is something that you can't simply fix overnight.

7
higgyC Avatar
3
1 Year ago

You raise some of the important points in this discussion, but I don't feel like the data upholds your conclusions.

The data taken from each of the games in that list that could be considered an eSport (with the exception of Riot's in-house monitoring of the LoL community) is taken from surveys of a small sample size with major flaws in their methodology. The LoL one, as you pointed out, is a dated source, and yes, though the female community isn't likely to have superceded the male in the past 3 years, it has grown massively.

Female representation, both on-screen at events and in the pro scene, should be aspirational, not reactionary. Meaning that it shouldn't only be justifiable to ask these questions once populations are approaching 50/50 splits.

Also, it's true that harassment is a constant online, and it's reasonable to expect flaming when you make a mistake. But the baseless and often far more abusive nature of it whenever a female name/voice is the target is way beyond reasonable. And yes, the solution isn't restricting comms, it should be fostering respect or some shred of empathy.

You're right that this isn't something to be fixed overnight, but no-one decided not to start building Rome because it would take more than a day.

3
Shriven Avatar
3354
Shriven(1 day 14 hours played)
1 Year ago

So, why separate Women and Men on a mental based game of skill? The explanation given doesnt make any sense.

6
Gonzo ® Avatar
20
Gonzo ®(1 day 2 hours played)
1 Year ago

"But I was just going to do the mission, and I was doing well… and immediately I'm called a hacker. Because there's no way a girl could be that good."

Everyone gets called a hacker for being good in Casual, that's not gender specific.

5
Belimawr Avatar
1158
1 Year ago

use to be even worse back in early FPS games, amount of times I got kicked from games of UT99 and Renegade for "hacking" was comical, considering a few times in UT99 it was because I was using the environment to kill people using aim bots.

it's part of why I got sick of competitive multyplayer, as it just turned into whining kids who would cry hack as soon as they came up against someone better than them.

but I've played online and took a pasting from female gamers, would never think it's because they hacked, it's just because they were better than me, it comes back to the same problem as above kids will cry when someone beats them and when a girl who has cooties beats them it just makes it worse.

2
Gwathdring Avatar
158
1 Year ago

I think you have to pay very little attention to think that harassment in online games is equitable. Sure, everyone gets harassed. But that's hardly an excuse--that's pretty shit to begin with and we need to do something about it.

But I think it's pretty clear from my time as a gamer that, whether or not it happens to everyone on SOME level, that harassment is not equitable.

Or have you already forgotten "fake geek girls"?

-1
Gonzo ® Avatar
20
Gonzo ®(1 day 2 hours played)
1 Year ago

Sorry if I totally misread your comment (it's 1 AM) but I never implied that harassment in gaming is justifiable, I was just joking. But I don't think most harassment in gaming is targeted towards women.

3
Gwathdring Avatar
158
1 Year ago

Gaming isn't a monolith. So no, gaming harassment is not targeted, en masse as a single coherent entity, at women. Nor is most harassment in games necessarily targeted at women. I'm not sure what you mean by "most harassment" because that's a rather more difficult thing to assess than what I'm talking about--which is already a messy thing to try to assess in the first place!

Harassment in games is not equitable. Harassment in games is not a demographically flat phenomenon.

This shouldn't surprise you, because harassment OUTSIDE of games isn't a demographically flat phenomenon either.

Harassment targets all sorts of people and comes form all sorts of people. But this kind of rhetoric is a pointless catch-22. Individuals are more complicated than the aggregates, averages, and stereotypes they can be summaized into but they are also smaller and more numerous and impossible to incorporate into a conversation. I can't speak about every single gamer ever and their habits and behaviors and experiences ... but I shouldn't have to.

Give me some credit here. When I say harassment in online games is inequitable, I'm not saying GAMERS HATE WOMEN or anything that pointless. What I'm suggesting, instead, is that saying "everyone gets harassed" is equally pointless whether or not you agree with me that no one should get harassed in the first place.

Not everyone gets harassed to the same extent and degree or in ways that line up identically with industry practice out-of-game experiences. Harassment in online gaming is not equitable. It is not demographically flat. We don't have to look down on or denigrate gamers as a whole or even specifically male gamers to note that gaming harassment is not uniformly distributed.

1
Dr Loxley Avatar
25
1 Year ago

The thing is; everything I've read here is not gender exclusive. For years I have avoided games like LoL out of genuine anxiety.

Only recently have I started playing HotS and that is because my small WoW guild and I play vs AI.

The reason for all of this is the toxicity of the community and I don't want to have to go through that.

For years back in 1999 to the early 2000 I was a tournament competing player, but I got tired of all the death threats, phone calls I would recieve and police reports I would file as a response to my clan doing well.

But of course no one wants to hear about any of that because I'm a white middle class married male.

Sadly all forms of gaming be it MMOs, MOBA, FPS, RTS and even the streaming/YouTubing of all of that is very secular and the 'in-group' do everything they can to keep the 'out-group' out.

4
Fraser Brown Avatar
956
1 Year ago

I don't think that's fair at all. Toxicity in general is well-reported and devs are, they say, attempting to put a stop to it. There isn't much coverage of women in esports, while there is a lot of coverage on toxicity and how it affects the mostly male playerbase.

Anyway! How have you found HotS? In my experience it's a lot less aggressive.

1
Ocid Avatar
272
1 Year ago

There isn't as much coverage of women in e-sports because by the admission of the article and the player talking about it the caliber isn't as good. I don't know. Never watched it.

Compare it to something like football. More people watch the premiership than the first division because the quality of play is generally better.

1
Fraser Brown Avatar
956
1 Year ago

Yes, I understand why there is less coverage. My point was that there is already a lot of coverage of men in esports, so Loxley shouldn't feel like nobody wants to hear about how he feels about toxicity in the games.

0
Dr Loxley Avatar
25
1 Year ago

I'm loving HotS, but currently it's only me, my wife and our mutual friend playing as a team vs AI. I understand that today for EU was a patch that lets us reduce the difficulty in AI, but until now it's been super hard - however that's made it all the better when we have won a match! :D

1
Fraser Brown Avatar
956
1 Year ago

I recommend trying some quick matches against other players. You occasionally get people taking it too seriously, but generally I've found it to be considerably less toxic than almost any other MOBA.

1
Xerkics Avatar
321
Xerkics replied to Fraser Brown
1 Year ago

Its certainly way less toxic than LoL was when i played it last and its a lot easier to pick up for non gamers since there is no super complicated item management and you have shared xp.

-1
Kinth! Avatar
180
Kinth!(10 hours played)
1 Year ago

The only real way around harassment online in such games is to find teams to play with. Obviously this is only a semi-solution and the problem on a whole needs to be dealt with. Harassment is probably the biggest issue with online gaming but no company has yet to come up with a decent solution. It's only got worse with free to play games since if you get banned you just make another account.

Even as a male I wont play many games alone. Never used mic in CS:GO outside of a team.

in terms of women in e-sport we need to be careful. I don't think female only tournaments is a good idea. While the intention may be to get female players exposure, it ends up serving the idea that the two should be segregated or that women aren't capable of the same level of play as men. Which isn't true.

It also doesn't help when one of them admits being more motivated to compete in women's tournaments basically because she thinks they are lower skilled.

"“When there are other people that have a similar background and are better than you, but the gap is smaller, I think it's naturally more motivating. You can use that as a stepping stone. Women's tournaments are more of a stepping stone to get to a higher competitive level."

That is basically saying that she doesn't believe women are as good as men at the game. You can't run around claiming women are as good as men and then admit that you see women's only tournaments as easier and as only a stepping stone to the higher competitive levels which are dominated by men.

2
Rob Zacny Avatar
101
1 Year ago

This is a good point and it's something I asked about. I think what happened to SC2 might be worth considering in this regard. When you let the best players (Koreans) compete everywhere with no restriction, they MASSACRED the foreign scene, and it hurt the game as a whole. We lost tons of former Euro / NA pros because there was no point in traveling to tournaments to get a Ro64 finish. I think women are in a similar boat right now. You're trying to build a player base and a competitive ecosystem that encourages budding talent. You don't do that by asking women to go compete with TSM or Na'Vi right away.

5
Jezcentral Avatar
488
Jezcentral(4 hours played)
1 Year ago

Really? I don't see those two statements as being incompatible at all.

2
Droniac Avatar
60
1 Year ago

A lot of that harassment also comes the way of male players. Women are a more obvious target, because there are so few of them who actually compete (openly), but the volume of hatred is rarely any less for any high tier / high skill / successful male player. That being said, women do tend to get more abuse from their own team if they're playing with randoms or baddies in something like CS or MOBAs.

As to women's tournaments being a stepping stone towards a higher competitive level: those things have been around for nearly two decades and there still aren't any women's teams competing at a 'higher' level. If that was ever really the intent then it has clearly failed spectacularly. The only women who ever got to, or anywhere near, that higher level never competed in women's leagues to begin with. And most of the examples of that are from older eSports and competitive games (Quake, UT, RtCW, W:ET, StarCraft: Brood War).

If you want to be a competent player at a high level in a competitive game, then you need to:

1) Play against players and teams better than you, preferably much better. It's demotivating, but it helps you grow enormously. Losses nearly always trump wins for growth both as a player and a team.

2) Play alongside people of roughly your skill level, or train under someone much better than you. The former is far more likely than the latter, obviously.

3) Find some buddies or sparring partners of similar or higher skill level. Again, neither of those are likely if you limit yourself to a minuscule exclusive scene.

I say this having competed at international top level in games like Jedi Knight 2, Jedi Academy, Unreal Tournament 2003 / 2004 iCTF, Unreal Tournament 3 CTF, Return to Castle Wolfenstein, Tactical Ops, Ground Control 2 and Guild Wars (1). I actually know how to reach that top, have done it repeatedly and have repeatedly trained entire teams to reach it too.

The whole concept of a women's scene as a means for "improvement" or "growth" stinks. They're excluding themselves from the ENTIRE top of the competitive scene, which in every game is either all male or mixed. Never all-female.

And because the women's scene is a tiny fraction of the total competitive player-base, the truly talented women are most frequently playing alongside and against people nowhere near their own skill level / potential. Thus not learning much, not improving very quickly, and very swiftly falling behind similarly skilled / talented male players who don't intentionally hobble themselves.

2
Anakhoresis Avatar
469
Anakhoresis(3 days played)
1 Year ago

What I find nuts is the harassment itself. I mean... Why? Don't get me wrong, when I lose a match I can be pretty irate, and I get into a game. But I don't harass people about it. And harassing someone because they're a girl playing video games seems weird too.

I just can't wrap my head around it in the first place.

EDIT: Also, I have most hours played so far. Ha HA! And I'm terrible at it still. I got kicked from a game for dying too much. Talk about being harassed. ;-; Apparently I'm a troll because I suck too much for having played so long.

2
somebody336 Avatar
83
1 Year ago

Every online game I've played has been very toxic. Even in the days of Quake and Half Life mods such as TF and CS people took playing a match far too seriously. Not a gender issue, if you go into a casual match and "own" them you will get some harassment regardless of sex.

2
Sniper Wolf ♥ Avatar
3
Sniper Wolf ♥(58 days 6 hours played)
1 Year ago

If you ever saw Team Siren...you'd know why.

I find the fact other women try to represent the gender as "professionals" and do it entirely wrong with the "take us serious or else" gimmick is the reason why people can't take us seriously in gaming.

We messed it up for ourselves.

2
yeye Avatar
17
1 Year ago

Every single pro player can tell you a similar story about harassment. It's so commonplace in these games that I get real tired of the same old stories about how x and y would have been great if it wasn't for twitch chat or random pubs being mean to them.

Just look at what happens when Sumail (a 15 year old millionaire) plays a match. Twitch chat is full of terrorist emotes and memes. Did trolls stop him from winning millions? Is a 15yo kid more mentally stable than every female pro or is there a difference in skill between these ladies and his fellow male pros?

The whole 'harassment doesn't let us improve past a point' tale is also debunked with Sumail's example. Kid played his first pro dota match this year.

Also, a girl that could compete with the top pro guys would be sponsored so quickly and by so many companies she would probably have sponsored water coming out of her taps at home.

ps. I would personally love to see female pros show up that can beat the established male pros.

1
Chaz Avatar
158
1 Year ago

Wow, I missed a shitstorm. First off, great article, well researched and presented. Love it.

Anyway... To all the dudes (because of course they're dudes) saying that general harassment isn't a gender problem, how many of you have girls who game close enough to you that you're able to see the amount of shit they get? Because I get nowhere near the amount of asshole comments as my wife gets even when we play the same games. It's not just her even, if ever I enter a competitive match and a team mate has a feminine username, I can guarantee there's going to be shit directed towards her. "Oh but maybe they should have a neutral username." Says the person who doesn't know how fucked that argument is.

Harassment isn't a gender problem, but when harassment is directed towards you simply for your gender, it is, and that happens far too often in gaming to not be problematic. I'm glad that whenever I'm harassed it's because I'm a "scrub" and not a "whore".

1
bladius Avatar
1
1 Year ago

You're looking at this wrong, making a "sexist" comment does not makes the person sexist. Hear me out.

The kinds of people that are toxic and troll do not care what they call you, they only care about hurting you/annoying you.

Are you female? Go back to the kitchen. High pitched voice? You're 12/have your balls dropped yet. Black? Gay? Disabled? You get the idea.

They will use any and all information you give them to make the insult more personal, and therefor more damaging. If you start focusing on "they are so sexist" you miss the point entirely. They are just bad people.

It's like how Riot seem to currently only perma-ban for sexist/hate speech. So because I'm a white male they can be toxic and only (potentially) get muted/temp-banned? Seems pretty stupid.

They need to get tough on every bit of toxic speech, not make a special protected class, or they'll get nowhere.

In regard to female/male ratios, I'm a firm believer in better=better paid/represented, competition must be encouraged in all regards.

So in regard to football for example, males get paid more because they are more able.

In regard to e-sports, you can not honestly tell me a team would not take a player based on gender if they were good enough, they just want to win nothing else matters. A lot of it will also arise from the mojority of female gamers being "casual gamers" (you've all seen the stats I assume), so where the number might seem off, the actual amount of females who want to be pro is significantly less.

1
RazFlagg Avatar
6
RazFlagg(7 hours played)
1 Year ago

Urgh... I stopped visiting Rock Paper Shotgun because of all their sanctimonious, hipster bullshit feminist articles. Hello Eurogamer!

-1
Rob Zacny Avatar
101
1 Year ago

hahaha, you've never actually READ Eurogamer, have you? Anyway, I don't think we've been harping on this point. This is one article and your reaction to is stop reading an entire website? I don't think the problem is on our end, in this case.

5
subedii Avatar
751
1 Year ago

What's hilarious is the number of single digit posters that crop up who are all of a sudden saying you've betrayed their deep investment in this site. :P

5
NihlusGreen Avatar
585
NihlusGreen(5 hours played)
1 Year ago

It's hilarious AND sad! I've no time for or interest in MOBA's so I don't read articles about them.

If you hate something so much why rush into the comments section to let us know? Why not just positively engage in something you enjoy?

2
boniek83 Avatar
110
boniek83(2 hours played)
1 Year ago

Making common problem a gender issue. Just. Stop.

-1
TehRawk Avatar
14
1 Year ago

The reason you dont see a lot of women competing at the highest level in competitive games. Is because of biology. Women tend to have a slightly slower reaction time than men. It has nothing to do with math. We are a gender dimorphic species. There is nothing you can do about this fact.

Women are free to participate in the same tournaments as men. Look at the CSGO player masq for example. She doesn't take the easy route, of playing in the female only tournaments.

I came to PCGamesN to get away from this gender ideologue bullshit. Guess I need to move on again.

-2
Fraser Brown Avatar
956
yoggesothothe Avatar
7
1 Year ago

I signed up an account just to say:

Good riddance.

I liked the utter lack of self-awareness this person demonstrated in using gender ideologue bullshit to protest against "gender ideologue bullshit".

4
Xerkics Avatar
321
1 Year ago

More Like women have better things to do with their lives than play computer games for a living, and so there is less of them and therefore those that could be pros could potentially be non interested at all.

-3
Tovias Avatar
1020
1 Year ago

Maybe they are shit at video games. Not like I play CS GO.

-7
Empyre Avatar
263
Empyre(12 days 5 hours played)
1 Year ago

Not exactly, but they are for sure not as good as the men and in my opinion that is the bottom line on why they are getting potatoes for their tournaments.

Is there actually anything stopping them competing with the men if they are actually good enough?

Articles like this are pointless, you can always make a point about some tournament being discriminant when it segregates the players in someway.

1
Tovias Avatar
1020
1 Year ago

This article is what you might call "click bait", not really point in taking it seriously, it's made so you click on it for some controversy discussion and what not, the less you can do is have ABP on.

0