Fallout 4’s astonishing world revealed in 9 minutes of gameplay, plus its weapon and housing crafting | PCGamesN

Fallout 4’s astonishing world revealed in 9 minutes of gameplay, plus its weapon and housing crafting

Fallout 4 crafting system

At the first big event of E3 Bethesda showed off Fallout 4 in all its glory. Coming out on November 10th this year, Fallout 4 is Bethesda’s most advanced and detailed game world, and that is completely apparent in this nine minutes of gameplay footage that game director Todd Howard showed off at the event. 

Starting pre-apocalypse in 1950’s Boston, the video takes you through the game’s neat character creation system, before taking a stroll out to the wasteland for some VATs action. 

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The game is being built on a next-gen version of Bethesda’s Creation engine, so whilst not completely new tech it does look leaps ahead of Skyrim in terms of detail and overall effect. Clothing has texture, there’s much more moving detail on robotic characters, and the world generally feels much more alive. 

The demo shows off how the Sims-like character creation offers great depth, without the need for any sliders. Just click and drag on the character’s face to change shapes and skin tones. You can play both genders, and characters will even call you by name thanks to over a thousand voice-recorded names. Your character also has a voice, and conversations can be played out in a Bioware-like cinematic camera if you so wish. 

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Out in the wastes you’ll be collecting a heap of junk, which traditionally has been used in Fallout games to trade in for bottlecaps. Not this time though; every piece of junk can be reduced to component parts and used in Fallout 4’s ridiculously deep crafting system. Feeling like an advanced version of Dead Island’s weapon crafting, Fallout 4 has 50 base weapons and over 700 modifications, allowing you to turn any gun into an impressive amount of variations. Some are sensible, some are plain bonkers. 

You’ll also be able to craft shelters to create your own player housing, and even embark on a Fortnight-like defence game where you build turrets and link up power generators to keep your newly-found settlement safe from super mutants and ghouls.

Fallout 4 releases this year on November 10th. I couldn’t be more excited for it. But what do you make of our first real look at the game?  

Thanks, Kotaku

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Kristo256 avatar*sigh* avatarTovias avatarXerkics avatar
*sigh* Avatar
286
2 Years ago

Turrets all for the inevitable zombie assault.

I dunno who's talking, but i want to take one of them laser weapons.... Or a club,

might be more satisfying.

And SMASH it over his head.

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Kristo256 Avatar
38
2 Years ago

Well, now it's official....good bye social life....amirite?

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Xerkics Avatar
424
2 Years ago

Lets hope its not as ugly a port as the previous fallouts , the pipboy inventory system was insufferable.

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Tovias Avatar
1026
2 Years ago

A shame about the removal of skills, I guess they will stick to the retardly simple system they introduced with Skyrim. This means TESVI will also suffer from this.

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Kristo256 Avatar
38
2 Years ago

Simple. yes but to be honest, I kind of think fallout would kind of improve from it a bit, For example. I'm a huge fan of Fallout 3, with It being the only rpg where I Literally can't be evil, (I've tried, multiple times) It would take away some of the monogamous replays,

for example, Whenever i leave vault 101 the first thing I always do (because I can't resist being the good guy) is get up my explosives to 25. It will stay at that 25 for all of the 50+ hours I will be playing, that single playthrough.

I do this just so I could disarm the bomb in megaton, NOT ONCE have I blown up megaton, I couldn't bring myself to do that. pretty much all of my Fallout 3 gameplays start the same, the first 3 hours are pretty much copy pasted, THIS could get rid of it.

Honestly, the only downside I see to this is that people are going to just use it to grind a skill up whenever they have a problem with it (Which btw will make getting lockpicking up to 100 go up from 40 minutes, to a few hours, which is a plus)

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Tovias Avatar
1026
2 Years ago

Removal of skills means we are losing more elements for role playing and the game itself is losing more of its depth, Skyrim became a really dull game when I realized they had gotten rid of all the skills and stats you would level up along with a lot of content. It feels like Skyrim is slowly turning their RPGs into open action games rather than role playing games.

Less ain't better, and the skill system has made part of fallout since it was created and it added a lot to its RPing potential.

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Kristo256 Avatar
38
2 Years ago

In skyrim it wasnt Removal of skills per se, Just dumbing down. I agree that the skills add depth, however from my point of view, It doesn't really go well with a FPS (well pretty much) like fallout, If it's a game like divinity, or Pillars of eternity, I'll gladly have that kind of skill leveling, however Somehow in fallout 3 and NV it kind of seems like an annoying constriction to me. I have no problem with a skill system like fallout 3-s however, I just don't think it goes together with a sandbox game like fallout

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Tovias Avatar
1026
Tovias replied to Kristo256
2 Years ago

Before sandbox games they are RPGs, and the skills restrictions are what make role playing a thing, outside of obviously the user's input.

Let's take the case of someone who wants to open something but isn't a master lockpicker, fine, then what the game gives you is another option such as a hidden key, an option to bash or blow open the lock and that way you aid the roleplaying aspect of the game.

The problem with 3 and NV isn't that skills fit poorly on it, but that the developers don't think big enough to make things accessyble to all kinds of players in different forms. Look at Divinity Origins. Oh you don't have a master lockpick? Fine destroy the chest but fuck up your weapon.

Instead of removing critical features for role playing and making the game more shallow, why not just expand on what you already have so it can fit every single playstyle out there in a balanced and rational way?

But no, that's not the Bethesda way.

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Kristo256 Avatar
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Kristo256 replied to Kristo256
2 Years ago

Now I agree with you, I'd have no problem with this if they actually made these extra plans, and left the old skill settings, but since they're obviously not going to do it, then that's why skyrim's skills are better suited, If they don't have those extra routes around the lock then It just feels constrictive. Leave the skills if you want but for gods sake give me a key hidden under a rug atleast so I can actually get the damn door open

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