Dark Souls 2 PC review | PCGamesN

Dark Souls 2 PC review

Dark Souls 2 review
0
0

I’m giving myself a pep talk. It’s 2AM, and I’m alone in my study building up my confidence. “It’s only three giant, metal monsters, Fraser. You’ve killed far more impressive bosses. You’ve just got to stop overthinking it, keep on your toes, and for the love of god, stop trying to sneak in more attacks.” In five minutes, I’ll be dead again. 

Dark Souls II is a infuriating, sometimes cruel RPG and has almost certainly contributed to my dwindling sanity. And it’s utterly brilliant. It is a game of frequent deaths and countless victories snatched from the greedy jaws of defeat. Sometimes, usually when “You Died” has been burned into my retinas, I hate it. I rail against the injustice of my untimely demise. But I’ll still be playing it hours later. Transfixed.

The kingdom of Drangleic is cursed. It’s filled to the borders with soul-hungry undead, gargantuan monsters and corrupted champions. And into it walks another hopeless, lost hero. Absent their memories, their humanity slowly being eaten away, they are given one task: collect the souls of Drangleic’s greatest entities and confront the old king. Sounds like a doddle. 

It is not. 

Fears over From Software chiseling away at the challenge to create a Dark Souls II that is easier for newcomers can be forgotten. New players won’t be utterly lost, but the third installment in the franchise is every bit as devious and savage as its forebearers. Death can come from anywhere: an ambush from two sides, a change in a bosses attack pattern, a dark room with a hole in the centre. 

But Dark Souls II does tread a slightly different path from the earlier games, one where systems are clearer and quality of life improvements make the journey smoother. While Dark Souls did eventually allow players to quickly travel between select bonfires - the game’s sanctuaries - the sequel opens this up to all bonfires. If one has been lit, it can be immediately accessed via any other bonfires. 

From Majula, the convenient hub town - populated with an increasing number of foggy-minded merchants discovered throughout Drangleic - paths spread out like spokes on a wheel. Each spoke may contain several areas, and without fast travel, getting to them requires traversing the previous regions. If death doesn’t rear it’s ugly head first. 

There’s not the interconnectedness of the last game, but in its place is a sprawling world of daunting size. Huge open spaces filled with blood-thirsty enemies are spread across Drangleic, punctuated with narrow corridors hiding ambushes and treasure. Exploring the kingdom and finding hidden paths and secrets rooms is paramount, and rewarding.

Dark Souls II’s dungeons run the gamut from fantastical ruined temple complexes jutting out of the ocean to shady pirate dens hidden away in dark caverns. Tourism might not be Drangleic’s main export, but there sure are a lot of beautifully designed places to visit. 

They spread out both vertically and horizontally, tasking players with long climbs and journeys far from the safety of the bonfires. They are mazes where forks in the road force decisions and there’s always the nagging doubt, the moments where you think “I should turn back”. But you push forward anyway, murdering the area’s inhabitants.

Said inhabitants won’t make murdering them easy, of course. A few hits from even a fairly mundane foe can spell death, sending the hero back to the last bonfire, absent souls and a portion of humanity. And with that it’s back to the trek through the ocean of respawned monsters, but with less health and thus heightened danger. 

But rarely does an enemy seem cheap. They all have weaknesses, and it’s a matter of studying them, looking for tells and experimenting with different attacks. A dynamic approach is necessary. Lacing a weapon with magical effects might make one battle easier, while another will require fast footwork and lots of dodging. Each battle becomes a puzzle, the solution to which leads to a satisfying victory in combat and perhaps the reward of more power. 

After enough deaths, monsters will simply pack it in and no longer respawn. No doubt sick of dying so many times, they’ve quit. Ostensibly this takes the challenge down a notch, because areas start to become less populated after frequent visits. However, by removing constant grinding from the equation the equilibrium is restored. No longer can heroes kill the same enemies over and over again to get more souls to level up with greater speed or spend at merchants.

None of the minor foes hold a candle to Dark Souls II’s bosses. Towering giants and indescribable horrors bar players’ progress. The range of them necessitates a varied inventory, filled with consumables that offer resistances and buffs, and even multiple armour sets. I found myself switching between medium and heavy armour, favouring the former when blocking with a shield was less effective than dodging.

0
0
Sign in to Commentlogin to comment
TenClub Avatar
293
1 Year ago

Been buying way too many games. I'll have to wait on this one but looking forward to playing it when I do.

Sounds great and I am glad to hear that the port is solid. I don't care how good a game is if the port is bad I am not giving a cent to the developer/publisher.

1
Danger Zone Avatar
64
1 Year ago

Someone please explain to me why Dark Souls is supposed to be fun. I played the first one on PC for quite a while. After dying a billion times, it never was about frustration or anger. It just dawned on me that I was not enjoying myself. It just seemed like a treadmill going nowhere except against the same brick wall. Plus, I had no idea what was going on with my character, and I was not able to decipher the game's mechanics. Am I alive? Am I dead? Am I a zombie? What the hell are these humanity things I'm collecting and what do I do with them? Am I not doing something I'm supposed to be? Aside from the constant dying, I found the experience to be miserable simply because the important parts of the game's systems were just not explained.

1
Oktober Storm Avatar
36
1 Year ago

Sounds like you threw yourself at the enemies without really learning anything. DS 1/2 isn't that hard once you realize you can't brute force your way through things, and start learning how the enemies behave. Once you start being careful you won't die unless you start taking risks.

1
Danger Zone Avatar
64
1 Year ago

Trust me: I tried. It simply was not fun. At all. Even a little bit.

1
Oktober Storm Avatar
36
1 Year ago

I can respect that. You just seem too intelligent to write it off as poor game mechanic. Is it possible you'd give it another try with perhaps a little guidance?

1
Danger Zone Avatar
64
1 Year ago

To me, "mechanics" imply the way a game plays and handles. That was no problem. One of the major problems I had was with design. I don't necessarily need to have my hand held throughout a game experience, but I at least require the major structural parts of a game's design to be sufficiently explained, to wit, the humanity system and what exactly the hell is going on with my character.

The overall philosophy of the game (i.e., die and die again) is something I do not find appealing. However, I do think it is a valid game design (as sales numbers obviously suggest). Some people find that kind of challenge almost like a dare from the developer to beat their game. I get that and if you dig it, that's cool. Personally, I like to progress through a game at a steady rate, which is against Dark Soul's very philosophy. It's not that I want a game to be easy, I just want to feel like I'm progressing through a storyline, like I would a book or movie. I enjoy video games like I enjoy those other storytelling media. I use games as a relaxing and distraction release. Something like DS plays against that, and that's likely why I don't "get" the game's appeal.

1
SpaceDementia Avatar
24
1 Year ago

I completely understand the "deciphering game mechanics" part and It's true that Dark Souls 1 or 2 hardly explain anything (such as what some specific items do or even how to light a torch!) and you're left to figure things out on your own. I think it's more or less intended though and I don't know whether it should be considered a downside. However in Dark Souls 2 they did make it just slightly more "accessible" - as they said - and through the use of helpful in-game tips (which are a lot more common in 2 because there are more players) you will be able to drag yourself through every boss and area. What's most fun about the Souls games for me is probably the combat and the HUGE variety of weapons you can wield, it's really fun experimenting around with them and I think they added even more weapons in the sequel. Altogether, though, I admit I can't really explain why it just isn't fun to you, it may just not be your type of game and there are no further details as to why this is so that I can come up with

1
Danger Zone Avatar
64
1 Year ago

I have read that DS2 is a bit more accessible. I do plan on getting it once it goes on a nice, fat sale. After my experience with the first, I don't want to drop $50 on it. I'm willing to give it a try, because I do enjoy the swords and sorcery RPG genre.

2
Try these free to play games
?

These are affiliate links - clicking them and playing the games directly supports PCGamesN

Latest PC games news