Monster Hunter World: Iceborne Tigrex guide – MHW Tigrex hunting tips | PCGamesN
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Monster Hunter World: Iceborne Tigrex guide – MHW Tigrex hunting tips

Tigrex made its Monster Hunter: World debut in a recent beta, here’s how to take it down

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Looking for tips on how to defeat Tigrex in the upcoming Iceborne expansion for Monster Hunter: World? Monster Hunter World: Iceborne is nearing its release, and fans are eagerly awaiting the myriad new features coming with the snowy expansion. A new hub town, the ability to ride mounts, and a new sprawling ice-covered locale are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to new content. The true star of the show, of course, is the roster of new monsters to hunt.

Iceborne introduces a number monsters to Monster Hunter: World, some new, some fan favorites from past games in the series. One returning monster is Tigrex, a flying wyvern who made its debut in 2007’s Monster Hunter Freedom 2. Characterized by its massive head and jaws, its horn-tipped head, yellow and blue color palette, and webbed forelegs, Tigrex has terrorized hunters across seven mainline Monster Hunter games, with World being the eighth.

Veteran hunters will be familiar with many of the attacks the MHW Tigrex employs in Iceborne, but this will be the first time facing the beast for newer players. With a pair of beta periods under the belt, Capcom has given hunters their first taste of how to fight Tigrex. Here are some tips and general strategy for hunting the newest flying wyvern to invade Monster Hunter: World.

MHW Tigrex hunting guide

So far, the environments Tigrex has shown up in are the Rotten Vale from the base game, and Hoarfrost Reach from the Iceborne expansion. Regardless of where you encounter Tigrex, though, this strategy should work.

While Tigrex is classified as a flying wyvern, it very rarely gets off the ground. Instead, it uses its great speed in an unrelenting assault against its assailants. One of Tigrex’s most common moves it to quickly crawl across the arena, damaging anything in its path. Luckily it’s easy to see this attack coming, and you should have ample time to roll out of the way. The trouble with this charge attack is that Tigrex likes to do it several times in a row, so don’t think you’re out of the clear because you dodged it once. When in doubt, keep rolling. Just remember to keep an eye on your stamina meter, especially if fighting in the cold.

Tigrex may not be able to fly, but it can glide. Periodically, it will jump into the air and dive at an angle. It can be tough to keep track of the monster when it does this, so using the lock-on feature is recommended. After landing, Tigrex tends to pause for a bit, making this a good time to land a quick couple of hits.

As any hunter worth their salt knows if it has a tail, cut it off. Tigrex is no exception to this rule. Its tail is one of the most important weapons, and it uses it in a variety of attacks. One of the most dangerous is a full 360 degree spin. You’ll want to give Tigrex a wide berth when you notice it winding up its tail. It’s possible that it’s just aiming to do a quick sideswipe instead of a full spin, but it’s best to play it safe and step back a bit. Remember, as soon as the tail is removed these attacks become much less effective.

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The best strategy for taking down Tigrex is to keep in close. Putting too much distance between you and it tends to provoke the repeated charging attacks which can put a strain on your stamina. Most of Tigrex’s attacks are plainly telegraphed, so they should be easy to avoid even when up close. If you find yourself taking too much damage, drop a health booster so that you can keep close and maintain consistent damage. This, we’ve found, is the most effective counter to Tigrex’s great speed. If all else fails, set a shock or pitfall trap and lure the wyvern into it.

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