Minecraft: Dungeons – all the latest details on the upcoming Minecraft RPG | PCGamesN

Minecraft: Dungeons – all the latest details on the upcoming Minecraft RPG

In September, Mojang announced a dungeon crawler set in the Minecraft universe. Here’s what we know so far

Long before Minecraft: Dungeons was revealed, Mojang has been content to rest on its humble laurels as the developer of a pop culture phenomenon. To date, Minecraft has sold over 175 million copies, is available on every platform imaginable, and boasts a veritable merchandise empire. Not since Pokemon has a video game IP so thoroughly permeated mainstream consciousness. It wouldn’t be until 2017 and the skyrocketing Fortnite player count that this feat would be matched.

What’s more remarkable is that, for the last decade, Mojang has risen to the heights of video game fame on the back of a single title. Minecraft has been more than enough to sustain a staggering amount of success, even without the help of sequels or spinoffs. True, there was the Minecraft: Story Mode adventure game, but that wasn’t developed by Mojang, and we all know about the grim fate of Telltale Games.

All this is to say that, given Mojang’s penchant for status quo, last year’s announcement of Minecraft: Dungeons came as quite the surprise. At Minecon 2018, Mojang teased a new dungeon crawling action-RPG game set in their recognisable universe with a Minecraft: Dungeons trailer. Since then we haven’t heard much about the game – until now at E3 2019, that is. Recently, Mojang executive producer David Nisshagen sat down for an interview with Game Informer and spilled the beans on a few new details about the elusive Minecraft: Dungeons. Plus, we got a gameplay reveal at E3 2019, so here’s what we know so far.

Minecraft: Dungeons release date

Mojang previously gave Minecraft Dungeons a 2019 release date when it was announced last September, but we now have a more specific launch date. The Minecraft Dungeons release date is Spring 2020.

Minecraft: Dungeons co-op

Minecraft: Dungeons features drop-in/drop-out four-player co-op play. According to Minecraft Dungeons executive producer David Nisshagen, the difficulty will change on the fly to match the number of players. The game is still playable solo, so you don’t necessarily need to party up to progress.

That said, Mojang’s co-op game inspirations are obvious. The team made their admiration of some of the best-known titles in the genre clear in an interview we had with the company at E3 2019. Minecraft: Dungeons owes plenty to Diablo and Left 4 Dead to name a couple which, when combined with Mojang’s already masterful formula, is quite the heady concoction.

Minecraft: Dungeons abilities

In Minecraft: Dungeons, you aren’t tied to a specific class for the entire game. Instead, your powers and abilities are tied to the gear you wear. Equipping a bow turns you into an archer, for example, and grabbing some heavy armor turns you into more of a tank.

From the gameplay reveal trailer the only abilities we could see were a lighting beam attack and dome defense shield, but we’re sure they’ll be a lot more.

“It’s like, do you want that cool thing? Go find it and wear it or wield it,” Nisshagen told Game Informer.

Minecraft: Dungeons crafting

In an unexpected twist for a game set in the Minecraft universe, Dungeons features neither mining nor crafting. According to Nisshagen, it was decided that traditional Minecraft gameplay was too slow for the faster-paced action Mojang was aiming for with Dungeons. Instead, the team has implemented a new enchantment system – similar to the one in the base game – that can augment gear in fun ways. The hope is to provide players with some flexibility in their gear loadout beyond random loot drops.

Nisshagen described the system to Game Informer: “Think of it like this: a sword drops. The sword has a couple of different enchantments options. You pick one of them and enchant it with that. The next sword drops. It has the same look and feel and combat animations and all of that stuff, but it has different randomised enchantments attached to it. One of them can be super powerful for area of effect attacks. The other could poison the enemy over time. Even if it’s the same base item, they have vastly different properties on them.”

This type of randomisation will enhance Minecraft: Dungeon’s replayability and calls to mind other loot-focused games like Fallout or Diablo.

Minecraft: Dungeons setting and procedural generation

Right now, it’s a bit unclear what structure Minecraft: Dungeons will have, but Nisshagen hinted at a hub area with more linear levels that can be revisited after they have been cleared. These levels will be procedurally-generated, with many biomes from the universe among the possible Minecraft seeds. Adventurers will also do battle with traditional Minecraft baddies, such as spiders and skeletons.

What we do know is this isn’t going to look like your typical game of Minecraft. This is as a result of its engine: while the vanilla craft-a-thon is powered with Java and later Bedrock, Minecraft: Dungeons is made in Unreal Engine. From our time with the game at E3 2019, it’s clear that this has enabled Mojang to seriously jack up its lighting effects and weapon tech.

Is Minecraft: Dungeons part of a multiverse?

In an interview with IGN in September, just days before Minecon 2018, Mojang CCO Jens Bergensten said Dungeons represents one facet of a Minecraft multiverse, as does Minecraft: Story Mode – which is disappearing for good, even if you own it. This is a decidedly vague statement, but it does point to the potential of more Minecraft products in the future.

More blocky Minecraft goodness:
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And there we are, that’s everything we know about Minecraft: Dungeons so far. It’s exciting to see Mojang expand their seminal universe that’s defined by experimentation beyond the open-world formula we’re all familiar with, even if it’s taken a decade to get to this point. We’re eager to learn more about Minecraft: Dungeons – hopefully sooner rather than later – and, when we do, you know exactly where to come.

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